first_img Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia Grange, says special emphasis is being placed on instituting safeguards for children on the roads and at schools. Story Highlights Children’s safety is the focus of activities being organised by the Government to commemorate Labour Day this year, on Thursday, May 23.Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia Grange, says special emphasis is being placed on instituting safeguards for children on the roads and at schools.“It is timely, and I think we should also address… the safety of our children from predators. We cannot overlook [this] in our planning and discussions, [as to] how we will address it in a public way,” she added.The Minister was addressing members of the National Labour Day Planning Committee, during a meeting at Jamaica House on Thursday (April 18).Ms. Grange, who chairs the committee, outlined the rationale for this year’s focus.“We thought that the elevation of road safety onto this national community-based platform will deepen the impact of the existing public-private road safety campaign led by the National Road Safety Council; Ministry of Transport and Mining; Ministry of Education, Youth and Information; JN foundation; and UNICEF Jamaica, among others,” she said.The Minister emphasized that Workers’ Week and Labour Day “occur at a critical period for our nation’s children and vulnerable road users, as they take place during Child Month and just before Road Safety Month”.Over the past several weeks, Committee members have been meeting to discuss activities for Labour Day, which culminates Workers’ Week beginning Sunday, May 19.Among the other slated activities are a national thanksgiving church service, and concert. The events will be formally unveiled during a ceremony to be announced. Labour Day is organised by the Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport in collaboration with several Ministries, Departments and Agencies, and community groups.The administrations of the Municipal Corporations are also instrumental in the planning and execution of activities at the community level. Children’s safety is the focus of activities being organised by the Government to commemorate Labour Day this year, on Thursday, May 23. “It is timely, and I think we should also address… the safety of our children from predators. We cannot overlook [this] in our planning and discussions, [as to] how we will address it in a public way,” she added.last_img read more

first_img Related Items:Dr. Dwayne Vernon, social development commission Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppKINGSTON, Dec.10 (JIS): The Social Development Commission (SDC) has created some 839 jobs for residents at the local level, through the Local Economic Development Support Programme (LEDSP). Speaking at a JIS ‘Think Tank’, on December 8, Executive Director at the SDC, Dr. Dwayne Vernon, said the SDC is using its platform of community involvement as the driving force to encourage community businesses for economic development and to create employment.He said that the LEDSP, an initiative of the Ministry of Local Government and Community Development, was launched in May 2015 to formalise community businesses, and grow entrepreneurship in communities. Dr. Vernon noted that of the 839 persons currently employed, 232 are full time, 408 part time, 199 seasonal and others assist, based on the need. “Currently, there are 138 active projects happening in different communities and these Local Economic Initiatives (LEIs) have a capital layout of $530 million,” he pointed out.He informed that 32 per cent of these community businesses are from the agro-processing industry, adding that there is a heavy use of agricultural produce and raw materials from these produce to make secondary products, such as pastries, sauces, jams, pickles, chocolate and other confectioneries, juices and wines. Another 29 per cent of the community businesses are poultry, and the remaining are manufacturing, art and craft, fashion and community tourism.Dr. Vernon said if all communities take the Local Government and community-based approach to economic growth, such as the LEI, this will improve employment in the country.He called on members of the public to embrace the Local Government Reform, which is a tool that will help them to participate in the decision-making and economic growth at the community and parish levels. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Kings Valley Road In Western Westmoreland Refurbished Recommended for youlast_img read more

first_img December 19, 2018 Dingeman Elementary perform for KUSI’s annual Songs of the Holiday Season KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Updated: 10:45 PM KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI)- For 25 years KUSI has produced a Christmas special that has become a tradition for school choirs throughout San Diego County.This year we also chose to spotlight some of the music directors who work tirelessly to get their young choir students ready for a trip to KUSI studios for a performance they will never forget.Meet Dingeman Elementary School’s Music Director Garner Saguil. Posted: December 19, 2018last_img read more

first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. (Phys.org)—A pair of professors, one with Charles Darwin University, the other Southern Cross University, both in Australia, has published a Comment piece in the journal Nature decrying the chaotic state regarding the classification of complex organisms. In their paper, Stephen Garnett and Les Christidis contend that failure to regulate taxonomy in the coming years could cause serious problems for conservation efforts directed towards preserving biodiversity. At the root of the problem, the authors point out, is that there is no single definition for the word “species”—they have found there exist approximately 30 definitions for the word, which allows scientists, politicians and other entities free reign to use it in whatever context they choose to meet their specific needs. But that, they note, puts at risk the validity of research efforts and provides fertile ground for those seeking to usurp conservation efforts for financial gain. They offer cannabis as an example: Some “species” offer the high users seek, while others do not—changing the classification could have legal ramifications both for those convicted of using it or going forward—should some species be legal and others not? There is also the case of killer whales—some have suggested breaking them into three distinct species, but if that happens, would all three remain protected from hunters? Another example is separating the Florida panther from the North American cougar. Doing so could allow those seeking to buy protected land in Florida for development purposes an opportunity if wording in state laws suddenly ceases to protect areas where the big cats live.What needs to happen, the authors suggest, is for a single body to take ownership of taxonomy—one capable of creating a definition for the words that are used to describe plant and animal groups. They suggest further that the proper group should be the International Union of Biological Sciences (IUBS), and they offer a four-step process for how it could be done: The IUBS would need to agree to take on such a role, a taxonomic commission would have to be created to agree on rules, subcommittees would need to be created to deal with organism subsets, and finally, a judicial committee would need to be created to serve as the final arbiter when disputes arise. © 2017 Phys.orgcenter_img Journal information: Nature More information: Stephen T. Garnett et al. Taxonomy anarchy hampers conservation, Nature (2017). DOI: 10.1038/546025a Study of biodiversity suggests a small increase in size of protected areas could reap large rewards Citation: Professors call for an end to the chaotic classification of organisms (2017, June 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-06-professors-chaotic-classification.htmllast_img read more