first_imgWANT to watch Saints for just a tenner a match? Then if you’re a ‘Young Adult’ you can take advantage of our great Early Bird Season Ticket deals.For just £133, you can take up your spot in the Hattons Solicitors West Stand and see your super Saints for the equivalent of just over a tenner a game – saving £62 over the course of the season.‘Gold’ bracketed North and Solarking South Stand season tickets can be secured for £194 – a saving of £79 on matchday prices in 2013.And with the East Stand priced at £12 per match and £123 for a season ticket, there’s a price point for everyone.Young Adults can also pay on Direct Debit.It’s simple to buy your ticket – either call into the Ticket Office at Langtree Park, telephone 01744 455 052 or log on to www.saintssuperstore.comA six month Direct Debit option is also available – forms are below.last_img read more

first_imgNATHAN Brown says Saints’ table-topping position is pleasing but there’s a fair way to go yet.His side took over at the summit of Super League following a 32-12 win over Salford.“Being where we are on the table is pleasing and we are quite comfortable with the fact we know where we are at,” he said. “To be blunt about it though, we know if we want to get to Old Trafford we need to continue to improve in a number of areas.“Internally, we have high hopes for ourselves and there is always a pressure to do well. Regardless of being in or out of the Cup it doesn’t add extra pressure. We have passionate fans, a passionate chairman and a passionate Board.“A couple of players here have come through the successful era and now it is up to the new and younger players to demand that of each other. There is a long way to go and the blokes are putting a lot in on the field and in training and are working hard.”Saints travel to Catalan this week and there has been some positive news on the injury front.Brown continued: “Ant Walker suffered a concussion so he should be ready this week whilst Tommy Makinson had a scan on his knee and it isn’t serious – he has an outside chance for Catalan.“We’re not sure yet on Jon Wilkin, we’re waiting for a specialist’s report.“Most of the players have had a few days off to freshen up, but the medical and rehab staff have been working overtime.“They didn’t get a break – and the rehab players have been working hard too.”last_img read more

first_imgOUR mercurial number 9 wants Saints to carry on where they left off when they travel to Castleford this week.James Roby says the second half performance against Wigan was right up there – and that needs to be emulated for 80 minutes if they want to be successful at the Tigers.“It was a great result for us and a fantastic night for all the supporters,” he said. “We put in a lot of effort and got the result. It was pleasing to get the win and the added bonus was Leeds losing so we could top the table.“Our second half was very good. We completed our sets the best we have done for a long time and that helped us build pressure.“In big games there isn’t a lot in it and luckily we put ourselves in a position to take advantage of mistakes.“Our kicking game was good and it put Wigan under pressure. If we kept doing that it was inevitable the cracks would show and they did. The attitude of the lads was there for all to see. They were the first to any loose balls and we took our opportunities.“We were pleased with our second half performance but to carry on we have to emulate that.”He continued: “Castleford beat Leeds last week so they will come in confident on Thursday. They are a fantastic team, especially at home and probably a few results haven’t gone their way.“Perhaps they are coming into form at the right time and we have to be ready for that.“We cannot afford to have any nights off; our attitude has to be spot on.”last_img read more

first_imgFILE PHOTO: Airplane engine parts are seen at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash, near the town of Bishoftu, southeast of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Tiksa Negeri/File PhotoFILE PHOTO: Airplane engine parts are seen at the scene of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET 302 plane crash, near the town of Bishoftu, southeast of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia March 11, 2019. REUTERS/Tiksa Negeri/File Photo Ethiopian Airlines pilots followed proper procedures when their Boeing MAX 8 airplane repeatedly nosedived before a March 10 crash that killed 157 people, Ethiopia’s minister of transport said on Thursday as she delivered the first official report on the disaster.“The crew performed all the procedures repeatedly provided by the manufacturer but was not able to control the aircraft,”  Dagmawit Moges told a news conference in the capital, Addis Ababa.In line with international rules on air accidents, the preliminary report did not attribute blame. Nor did it give a detailed analysis of the flight, which is expected to take several months before a final report due within a year.But in a clear indication of where Ethiopian investigators  are focusing most of their attention, the report cleared the pilots of using incorrect procedures and issued two recommendations directed at planemaker Boeing and regulators.It suggested that Boeing review the aircraft control system and aviation authorities confirm the problem had been solved before allowing that model of plane back into the air. It was grounded globally following the crash, which was the second deadly accident in six months involving the new model after a Lion Air crash in Indonesia in October that killed 189 people.“Since repetitive uncommanded aircraft nose down conditions are noticed … it is recommend that the aircraft control system shall be reviewed by the manufacturer,” Moges said.Ethiopian Airlines said its crew had followed all the correct guidance to handle a difficult emergency.However, the report could spark a debate with Boeing about how crew responded to problems triggered by faulty data from an airflow sensor, particularly over whether they steadied the plane before turning key software off.Boeing said it would study the report.Families of the victims, regulators and travellers around the world are waiting for clues to the accident after the new Boeing jet crashed six minutes after take-off.The preliminary report into the Lion Air disaster said the pilots lost control after grappling with the plane’s Manoeuvring Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) software, a new automated anti-stall feature that repeatedly lowered the nose of the aircraft based on faulty data from a sensor.Boeing said on Wednesday it had successfully tested an update of the MCAS software designed to reduce its authority and make it easer for pilots to handle.WhatsApp SharePrint <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more

first_imgBrighton have scored two or more goals in seven of their last 10 home league games and should be relied on for more goals tonight but the pressure to get goals could easily leave the back door open too.The Star Special of both teams to score and a winner in 90 minutes looks a fair bet. I’ve just no idea which way so will have equal stakes on both outcomes.RECOMMENDED BETS (scale of 1-100 points)BACK BOTH TEAMS TO SCORE AND BRIGHTON WIN for 6 points at 5/1 with Star SportsBACK BOTH TEAMS TO SCORE AND SHEFFIELD WEDNESDAY WIN for 6 points at 13/2 with Star SportsSunday: BET VOIDWhat’s your view? CALL STAR SPORTS 08000 521 321 [dropcap]U[/dropcap]nfair. That, of course, is the damn problem with the play-off system.The fact that Brighton were within one win of automatic promotion to the Premier League when they went to the Riverside counts for nothing – as does the fact that they finished 15 points clear of Sheffield Wednesday in the ‘regular’ season.Not only does it count for nothing – it also counts AGAINST them in my opinion. Brighton have had to regroup after coming so close yet Sheffield Wednesday are like a free roller at a poker tournament – playing carefree hands at a party that (for most of the season) they never expected to be at – four consecutive wins in March doing the trick for Wednesday.It’s pointless whinging, as the rules are there for one and all but I’ve never been a great supporter of the play-off system which may well add end of season drama (and contribute to the new Wembley building costs) but remains a tad gimmicky for my liking.The pressure certainly showed on The Seagulls in the first leg at Hillsborough when Sheffield Wednesday raced into a 2-0 lead thanks to goals from Ross Wallace and Kieran Lee – the deadlock finally broken between the pair as both matches in regular season had finished 0-0.That leaves Brighton with plenty of work to do but in a funny way less pressure than if it had been, say, 0-0 in the first leg. Brighton may well relish the challenge of now being underdogs and can grab the match and the challenge by the b**** from the outset.That certainly seems to be the view of the Brigton players too. Sam Baldock told the club website: “We’ve got nothing to lose now and the pressure is completely on them. We’re positive and we’re going to go for it. We’ve got 90 minutes for them to come to the Amex with a full stadium, with screaming fans egging us on.”He added: ”Stranger things have happened. I came off the pitch thinking, ‘Come on, bring on Monday,’ because believe me, this tie is not over.”Certainly, an early goal would make life interesting and I wouldn’t be completely surprised to see this one go the distance into penalties.Brighton have fared worse in the injury stakes with doubts over Tomer Hemed, Connor Goldson, Anthony Knockaert and Steve Sidwell from the first leg.Wednesday boss Carlos Carvalhal may well name an unchanged side.Brighton & Hove Albion v Sheffield WednesdayChampionship Play-Off Semi-Final 2nd Leg19:45 Sky Sports 1 / Sky Sports 1 HDHEAD TO HEAD RECORD(Maximum 10 matches)May 2016 CHAMPIONSHIP PLAY-OFF Sheff Wed 2-0 BrightonMar 2016 CHAMPIONSHIP Brighton 0-0 Sheff WedNov 2015 CHAMPIONSHIP Sheff Wed 0-0 BrightonFeb 2015 CHAMPIONSHIP Sheff Wed 0-0 BrightonAug 2014 CHAMPIONSHIP Brighton 0-1 Sheff WedMar 2014 CHAMPIONSHIP Sheff Wed 1-0 BrightonOct 2013 CHAMPIONSHIP Brighton 1-1 Sheff WedFeb 2013 CHAMPIONSHIP Sheff Wed 3-1 BrightonSep 2012 CHAMPIONSHIP Brighton 3-0 Sheff WedApr 2011 LEAGUE ONE Brighton 2-0 Sheff WedSTAR SPECIALSlast_img read more

first_imgShareCONTACT: EllenChangPHONE: (713) 348-6777EMAIL: [email protected] LECTURER AT CREEKMORESYMPOSIUM TO ADDRESS MULTICULTURAL EDUCATIONSonia Nieto, a leadingeducator on the teaching of children, will speak about educating multiculturalchildren during the Hazel Creekmore Symposium sponsored by Rice University’sCenter for Education on March 27-28.The topic of this year’ssymposium is “Effectively Educating Latino Students: What Teachers Need ToKnow.” Nieto, a professor ofeducation at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, will meet with communityleaders, administrators, teachers and students during the symposium. Nietoresearches multicultural education, the education of Latinos, immigrants andother culturally and linguistically diverse students. The lecture will beginat 4:30 p.m. in the Grand Hall of the Rice Memorial Center. A reception and booksigning will follow the talk.In addition to thelecture, Nieto will serve on a panel at 10 a.m. on March 28 in FarnsworthPavilion at the Student Center. The topic will be “What Keeps Teachers Going,Despite Everything.” Both the lecture and the panel discussion are open to thepublic. FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis center_img About adminlast_img read more

first_imgCombining Honda’s expertise in robotics and in motorbikes, Tom Hylton envisions a solution that helps disabled ride bikes, perhaps even in a professional capacity.The Honda Prosthetic Arm exists in the capacity of a concept, and allows people without an arm to operate a Honda motorcycle. The arm attached at the shoulder and plugs right into the handlebar, giving you a great grip over the bike. The robotic arm is also built to send commands to the bike, allowing you to accelerate, decelerate, or even brake without the need of a palm or a hand.“The bike and the prosthetic communicate with each other and the rider to calculate appropriate lean angles and aid body positioning, it will also eject with the rider in the event of an accident. It Is modular to suit trans-humeral and trans-radial amputees and I’m currently designing a leg to go with.” says designer Tom Hylton.Designer: Tom HyltonSharePinShareFlipSharePocket896 Shareslast_img read more

first_img Google+ St. Charles Cancer Center Grand Opening Celebration LinkedIn Pinterest Twitter E-Headlines Tumblr Facebook 0 Patients, family members, friends, donors, caregivers, physicians and all those interested in attending are invited to the grand opening celebration for the new St. Charles Cancer Center. The event will begin at 5:30pm, August 14 with a short program, ribbon-cutting ceremony, tours of the facility and refreshments in the healing garden. Dr. Dhara MacDermed will play the cello during the event accompanied by an 89-year-old cancer survivor.“We started this journey many years ago to build a comprehensive cancer center where all services are available in one location,” said Dr. Linyee Chang, medical director of the St. Charles Cancer Center. “It is time to celebrate the incredible amount of time, effort and resources that have gone into making this healing facility a reality.”The $13 million cancer center was designed and developed with input from caregivers and patients. Floor-to-ceiling windows along one wall of the medical oncology room will give chemotherapy and other infusion patients a healing, peaceful view during their treatment. Exam rooms have separate entrances for patients and staff, so that patients have a direct route with little congestion in the hallways. Work areas for physicians, nurses and other patient care support staff are located in an open, central area where the entire team can communicate easily and better coordinate care.The new Les Schwab Medical Oncology Wing opened to patients July 1, while the John D. Picchetti Radiation Oncology Wing renovation will be complete this month.Thanks to community donations, St. Charles Foundation has raised 97 percent of its $5.7 million capital campaign toward the project.“This event is one way we hope to show our gratitude to the Central Oregon community for coming together and supporting cancer services in our region,” said Lisa Dobey, executive director of St. Charles Foundation. “Please join us as we celebrate the care and service this new center will provide our community for decades to come.”www.stcharleshealthcare.org By CBN St. Charles Cancer Center Email Share. on August 12, 2014last_img read more

first_imgWade Wingler, Director of Assistive Technology, at Easter Seals Crossroads, shows us shows us an app called Type. This is a “minimal writing app” that helps students with learning disabilities and dyslexia take better notes.Check it out here:Share this…TwitterFacebookPinterestLinkedInEmailPrint RelatedMonday Tech Tip: Weather Pro appDecember 7, 2015In “Tech Tips”Monday Tech Tip: WAZE app (community-based navigation app)July 6, 2015In “Tech Tips”Monday Tech Tip: Inclusive AndroidAnna Leung, Assistive Technology Specialist, at Easterseals Crossroads shows us an Android app called Inclusive Android which is a portal which a lot of accessibility information for people with disabilities.November 28, 2016In “Tech Tips”last_img read more

first_imgMay 14 2018In a new study based on mouse cells internationally leading protein researchers have identified several new potential targets using state-of-the-art technology, many of which could be employed for future treatment of different types of cancers and diseases.Protein researchers from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research at the University of Copenhagen have used mass spectrometry based proteomics to uncover a number of proteins which could play a critical role propagating signals within cells that can lead to uncontrolled cell growth – one of the hallmarks of cancer.The study, which has been published in the internationally acclaimed scientific journal Cell Reports, was conducted using mouse fibroblast cells.The researchers behind the study believe the results may prove important to the development of new so-called tyrosine phosphatase-inhibiting drugs for patients suffering from different types cancer – for example Leukemia – as well as other types of diseases such as Noonan syndrome.Globally, cancer is one of the leading causes of death according to the World Health Organization. In Denmark one in every three Danes develops cancer at some point in their lives, according to statistics from the Danish Cancer Society.Advanced Cell Communication Can Inhibit Cancer DevelopmentThe researchers focused on the protein communication and signaling that takes place inside the cells. Misregulation of protein signaling often leads to an increase in the production of tumors. By understanding the mechanisms and regulation of these signals, the researchers can specifically target the proteins responsible with drugs.Using mass spectrometry proteomics to analyze the proteins of cells treated with various growth hormones in combination with advanced data analysis, the researchers discovered proteins that manipulate the communication processes inside the cells initiated by cell receptors and thus inhibit the development of cancer.When inhibited the prominent protein tyrosine phosphatase called Shp-2 caught the researchers’ attention.’This in fact leads to the deactivation of a very prominent cell growth pathway, which is the main pathway that people often try to target in cancer cells’, Professor Jesper Velgaard Olsen from the research group explains.Related StoriesResearchers identify potential drug target for multiple cancer typesNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerEmbrace your natural skin tone to prevent skin cancer, say experts100 potential targetsAt the beginning of the study, the researchers knew of a handful of proteins which were regulated by Shp-2. However, using the mass spectrometry analyses the researchers discovered around 100 potential new targets, revealing a far more complexity than previously considered.Now the researchers need to do further studies to determine the role and mechanisms of these proteins. They are already following up on their first results with human cells.’Now we are doing follow-up projects, looking specifically at leukemia, where the cancer cells have mutations in these different receptors which can be regulated by Shp-2′, says Postdoc Tanveer Singh Batth.Cancer patients are often treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors, which block pathways inside the cells to inhibit tumor growth. However, many develop resistance to current clinical inhibitors thus there is a substantial need for finding new proteins that can be used as drug targets.Personalized MedicineThe researchers’ new discoveries can be used in the development of personalized medicine, where preventive treatments can be targeted at the patients’ personal DNA or protein expression profiles.’It will be a drug that can be used only in a world with personalised medicine, where it will not be given to for example all leukaemia patients, but only to those with mutations in one of the receptor tyrosine kinases where we now know this Shp-2 protein operates’, says Professor Jesper Velgaard Olsen.Personalised medicine is gaining ground in Denmark. In 2016 the Government and the Danish Regions launched a strategy for efforts involving personalised medicine. A main part of the strategy is the establishment of a National Genome Center.Fact Box: The study described in this article was conducted using mouse cells. The researchers use animal models to accumulate more knowledge on the subject, before the test is potentially performed on humans. This means that the same test does not necessarily produce the same results when conducted on humans. The test meets existing laws on animal testing. Far from all studies result in concrete treatment methods, and the process can take several years. Source:http://healthsciences.ku.dk/news/2018/05/researchers-uncover-up-to-100-potential-drug-targets-for-cancer/last_img read more

first_imgJul 19 2018A clinical trial of the use of adrenaline in cardiac arrests has found that its use results in less than 1% more people leaving hospital alive – but almost doubles the risk of severe brain damage for survivors of cardiac arrest. The research raises important questions about the future use of adrenaline in such cases and will necessitate debate amongst healthcare professionals, patients and the public.Each year 30,000 people sustain a cardiac arrest in the UK and less than one in ten survive. The best chance of survival comes if the cardiac arrest is recognized quickly, someone starts cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and defibrillation (electric shock treatment) is applied without delay.The application of adrenaline is one of the last things tried in attempts to treat cardiac arrest. It increases blood flow to the heart and increases the chance of restoring a heartbeat. However it also reduces blood flow in very small blood vessels in the brain, which may worsen brain damage. Observational studies, involving over 500,000 patients, have reported worse long-term survival and more brain damage among survivors who were treated with adrenaline.Despite these issues, until now, there have been no definitive studies of the effectiveness of adrenaline as a treatment for cardiac arrest. This led the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation to call for a placebo-controlled trial to establish if adrenaline was beneficial or harmful in the treatment of cardiac arrest. This “Pre-hospital Assessment of the Role of Adrenaline: Measuring the Effectiveness of Drug administration In Cardiac arrest (PARAMEDIC2)” trial was undertaken to determine if adrenaline is beneficial or harmful as a treatment for out of hospital cardiac arrest.The trial was funded by the National Institute for Health Research, sponsored by the University of Warwick and led by researchers in the University’s Clinical Trials Units – part of Warwick Medical School. The trial ran from December 2014 through October 2017. It was conducted in 5 National Health Service Ambulance Trusts in the United Kingdom, and included 8000 patients who were in cardiac arrest. Patients were allocated randomly to be given either adrenaline or a salt-water placebo and all those involved in the trial including the ambulance crews and paramedics were unaware which of these two treatments the patient received.The results of the trial have now been published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) on Thursday 19th July 2018 in an article entitled “A Randomized Trial of Epinephrine in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest”.Related Stories’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeStudy analyzes high capacity of A. baumannii to persist on various surfacesOf 4012 patients given adrenaline, 130 (3.2%) were alive at 30 days compared with 94 (2.4%) of the 3995 patients who were given placebo. However, of the 128 patients who had been given adrenaline and who survived to hospital discharge 39 (30.1%) had severe brain damage, compared with 16 (18.7%) among the 91 survivors who had been given a placebo. In this study a poor neurological outcome (severe brain damage) was defined as someone who was in a vegetative state requiring constant nursing care and attention, or unable to walk and look after their own bodily needs without assistance.The reasons why more patients survived with adrenaline and yet had an increased chance of severe brain damage are not completely understood. One explanation is that although adrenaline increases blood flow in large blood vessels, it paradoxically impairs blood flow in very small blood vessels, and may worsen brain injury after the heart has been restarted. An alternative explanation is that the brain is more sensitive than the heart to periods without blood and oxygen and although the heart can recover from such an insult, the brain is irreversibly damaged.Professor Gavin Perkins Professor of Critical Care Medicine in Warwick Medical School at the University of Warwick (and the lead author on the paper) said:”We have found that the benefits of adrenaline are small – one extra survivor for every 125 patients treated – but the use of adrenaline almost doubles the risk of a severe brain damage amongst survivors.””Patients may be less willing to accept burdensome treatments if the chances of recovery are small or the risk of survival with severe brain damage is high. Our own work with patients and the public before starting the trial identified survival without brain damage is more important to patients than survival alone. The findings of this trial will require careful consideration by the wider community and those responsible for clinical practice guidelines for cardiac arrest.”Professor Jerry Nolan, from the Royal United Hospital Bath (and a co-author on the paper) said:”This trial has answered one of the longest standing questions in resuscitation medicine. Taking the results in context of other studies, it highlights the critical importance of the community response to cardiac arrest. Unlike adrenaline, members of the public can make a much bigger difference to survival through learning how to recognize cardiac arrest, perform CPR and deliver an electric shock with a defibrillator. “Source: https://warwick.ac.uk/newsandevents/pressreleases/using_adrenaline_in/last_img read more

first_imgJul 20 2018The governing board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) unanimously approved this week two grants worth more than $2.2 million to University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers investigating stem cell-based therapies for a rare genetic disorder that affects the heart and a chronic, progressive affliction of the lungs.The first grant for almost $1.4 million was awarded to cardiologist Eric Adler, MD, professor of medicine, director of cardiac transplant and mechanical circulatory support at UC San Diego Health and member of the UC San Diego CIRM Alpha Stem Cell Clinic, to pursue the use of genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells to treat Danon disease, a progressive condition characterized by weakening of the heart muscle, weakening of muscles used for movement and cognitive disability.Related StoriesStudy: Megakaryocytes play an important role in cell migrationNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellSingle-cell encapsulation technology can protect transplanted MSCs from immune attackIn many cases, Danon disease is inherited from a parent, and is often misdiagnosed and treated as heart failure. The condition involved dysfunction in lyposomes -; organelles found in nearly all animal cells that contain enzymes used to break down many kinds of biomolecules. There is no cure and, in the case of the heart, the condition is fatal unless a heart transplant is performed.Adler is one of the few researchers in the United States studying the condition. His CIRM grant will support further research into using genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells, which give rise to other blood cells, to treat the condition.The second CIRM grant for $865,282 (with a recommendation of an additional $527,918 to be awarded at the October board meeting) went to James Hagood, MD, pediatric pulmonologist and chief of pediatric respiratory medicine at Rady Children’s Hospital-San Diego and chief of the Division of Respiratory Medicine in the Department of Pediatrics at UC San Diego School of Medicine, to investigate the use of mesenchymal stem cell extracellular vesicles (MSC-EV) as a therapy for pulmonary fibrosis. The latter is a lung disease that occurs when lung tissue becomes damaged and scarred, making it more difficult for the organ to work properly. Current therapies can ease symptoms, such as shortness of breath, dry cough and fatigue, but the damage cannot be repaired.Mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into a variety of cell types, from bone and cartilage to muscle and fat. Extracellular vesicles are cell-derived membranous structures that carry information between cells. They play a key role in the development and progression of many pulmonary diseases, including fibrosis. MSC-EV are already entering clinical trials for a number of diseases. In this case, the researchers want to better understand how MSC-EV function and how they can be modified to maximize their anti-fibrotic potential. Source:https://health.ucsd.edu/news/releases/Pages/2018-07-20-uc-san-diego-researchers-receive-funding-to-pursue-novel-stem-cell-based-therapies.aspxlast_img read more

first_imgThere, postdoc Thomas Crowther and remote sensing expert Henry Glick and colleagues compiled not just satellite data, but also tree density information from researchers measuring and counting trees in forest plots around the world. Using 400,000 ground-based data points, they converted other satellite images into tree density estimates to get more accurate tree counts in areas not surveyed by hand. In addition, they incorporated data from a 2013 report on changes in forest cover to get a sense of whether forests were expanding or shrinking.The densest areas of tree coverage are the boreal forests of the Arctic, whereas deserts support the fewest trees per hectare. Even so, cold places have just 24% of the trees, whereas the tropics and subtropics support almost 43%. The rest are distributed throughout other places, including temperate zones.In all areas, human impact was the dominant influence on tree density, the researchers found. By combining tree density measures with forest cover estimates for the past 12 years, Crowther, Glick, and colleagues concluded that humans are responsible for the loss of 15 billion trees a year. They think that about 5 billion new trees are planted or sprout annually, yielding a net loss of 10 billion. Since the beginning of human civilization, the number of trees has dropped by 46%, they estimate.Although these numbers are impressive, not even Crowther thinks they tell the whole story. “Tree size, species identity, and tree qualities matter hugely in accounting for the importance of forests and trees outside of forests,” says Robin Chazdon, a forest ecologist on leave from the University of Connecticut, Storrs. “This study does not take those attributes into account.”Crowther and his colleagues plan to start looking into how to quantify those aspects, particularly the sizes of trees, because that determines how much biomass—and consequently carbon storage—in each one. But one thing is clear: Even the 14.2 billion trees planted in the Billion Tree program is just a drop in the bucket. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country It’s a good news, bad news report. Earth today supports more than 3 trillion trees—eight times as many as we thought a decade ago. But that number is rapidly shrinking, according to a global tree survey released today. We are losing 15 billion trees a year to toilet paper, timber, farmland expansion, and other human needs. So even though the total count is large, the decline is “a cause for concern,” says Tom Spies, a forest ecologist with the U.S. Forest Service in Corvallis, Oregon, who was not involved with the work.Forests are important to humans, not just for their products, but also for their ability to foster biodiversity, store carbon, preserve water quality, and perform other ecosystem services. Up to 45% of the carbon stored on land may be tied up in forests. But figuring out how many trees grace our planet has been a difficult task. To date, most forest assessments have estimated tree cover based on satellite images. In 2005, one group converted that coverage into a measurement known as tree density and concluded the planet was home to 400 billion trees, or 61 trees per person alive at the time.The newest count, published online today in Nature, had a more down-to-earth component. Almost 3 years ago, Plant-for-the-Planet, which took over the United Nations’s Billion Tree Campaign, wanted to know whether it was making an impact. In its first 5 years, the campaign had planted 12 billion trees in 193 countries to promote the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The group asked Yale University foresters for help. Emailcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe In early 2014, Iranian President Hassan Rouhani’s administration was in the middle of intense negotiations with the United States and other nations to limit Iran’s nuclear aspirations. Rouhani, considered a moderate reformer, was under attack by his country’s hardline conservatives, who opposed a potential deal. Rouhani challenged Iranian intellectuals to come out and publicly support his policies.“Why is the university silent? Why are the professors silent?” Rouhani said. “What are you afraid of?”One answer may be that they were afraid of being jailed, suggests Anna Maryam Rafiee, a cultural heritage specialist in Toronto, Canada. Her father, chemist Mohammad Hossein Rafiee, has been stuck in a cell in Iran’s notorious Evin Prison since June 2015, after speaking out in favor of the nuclear deal that was announced a month after he was imprisoned. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Emailcenter_img Now, more than 300 scholars and scientists, including seven Nobel laureates, have signed an open letter calling on Iran to release Rafiee. “Restricting Dr. Rafiee’s rights to freedom of expression through arrest and detention, the conditions of his prosecution, and his inhumane conditions in Evin Prison represent violations of both the Constitution of the Islamic Republic of Iran and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights to which the Islamic Republic of Iran adheres,” the 27 January letter says. Numerous organizations, including Amnesty International and the American Chemical Society, are also calling for the release of the chemist, and the U.S. government has said he is a political prisoner.  More than a year before the nuclear deal was finished, Rafiee, a retired professor from the University of Tehran, had written an analysis that supported the negotiations. He sent his 120-page paper to the Iranian government. Then, in June 2014, he spoke out publicly, publishing his analysis on his website.That’s when the harassment began, his daughter tells ScienceInsider. “On June 30, 2014, the [Iranian] intelligence ministry raided our house,” she says. “They tried to find something in our house to use against my father in the court.” Rafiee was ultimately arrested—“kidnapped in the street by intelligence agents,” Anna Maryam Rafiee says. After a secret trial, she says her father was sentenced to 6 years in prison for “spreading propaganda against the regime,” as well as “membership in an illegal group,” known as the Melli Mazhabi, a part of the Freedom Movement of Iran.Her dad has described the prison as a “torture chamber,” Anna Maryam Rafiee wrote last year in The Guardian. He was sleeping on the floor, she wrote, because his cell didn’t have enough beds for the 28 prisoners in it.Prison officials did not allow Rafiee to attend his most recent court hearing, says his daughter. “According to the judge, my father could be released on bail” during his appeal, she says, but that hasn’t happened. This was not Rafiee’s first brush with Iranian authorities. He was arrested in 2000 for being a member of the Melli Mazhabi, and sentenced to 4 years in prison, which he never served. Rafiee’s imprisonment reflects Iran’s perilous internal politics, says one of the letter’s signers, chemical engineer Muhammad Sahimi of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Rouhani’s request for academics to speak up in favor of the nuclear negotiations was “sincere,” Sahimi tells ScienceInsider. But “Rouhani does not control the judiciary and the intelligence unit of the IRGC [Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps],” a more hardline group in Iranian politics.Rafiee “and his comrades have always been under tremendous pressure by the hardliners in Iran, because they know that the [Melli Mazhabi] is appealing to university students and other strata of the Iranian society,” Sahimi adds. The group, he asserts, is “squeaky clean.”Representatives of the Iranian government in the United States declined to comment on the case. (Iran hasn’t had its own embassy in the United States since 1980.) “I don’t know. I’m not familiar with it. I can’t say anything about it,” says Fariborz Jahansoozan, who works in the legal affairs department of the Iranian interests section of the Pakistani Embassy in Washington, D.C. (He did say that science is “important for the country.”)“We would consider [Rafiee] to be a political prisoner under these circumstances and would call for his release, as we do for other political prisoners in Iran,” said an official with the U.S. State Department, in a statement provided to ScienceInsider.Anna Maryam Rafiee, meanwhile, says her father’s case could have long-lasting implications. “I wonder who will trust President Rouhani,” she wrote in The Guardian, the “next time he puts out a call for Iranian intellectuals and academics to rally behind him.” Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

first_img Research stays frozen in Canadian budget Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Department of Finance Canada NSERC, though, will receive $8.1 million over 5 years to administer a PromoScience Program that introduces youth, particularly unrepresented groups like Aboriginal people and women, to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics through measures like “space camps and conservation projects.” CIHR, meanwhile, could receive modest amounts from separate plans to identify climate change health risks and to reduce drug and substance abuse, the officials added.Overall, the Liberals demonstrated a propensity for rejigging or modifying existing programs and labeling them with grandiose titles, typically in the form of “strategic plans” or “national funds.” Foremost among those, Canada’s Innovation and Skills Plan, would funnel $600 million over 5 years allocated in 2016, and $112.5 million slated for public transit and green infrastructure, to create Silicon Valley–like “super clusters,” which the budget defined as “dense areas of business activity that contain large and small companies, post-secondary institutions and specialized talent and infrastructure.” A primary aim of the plan will be to “increase investment in innovation by business in six key areas – advanced manufacturing, agri-food, clean technology, digital industries, health/bio-sciences and clean resources.”The details of most of the new strategic plans and national funds are sketchy, and Morneau indicated they won’t be released for months. But all appear broadly aimed at promoting more commercialization.A new Strategic Innovation Fund, for example, will shuffle $75 million in new monies and $870 million from existing programs to support aerospace, defense, and automotive innovation into one pie that can also be accessed by “dynamic and emerging sectors, such as clean technology and agri-food.” A new Impact Canada Fund saw roughly $285 million over 11 years in largely reprofiled monies to resolve “the big challenges that face Canadians,” starting with the reduction of diesel fuel use in rural communities and the promotion of “machine-to-machine communication helps to ease traffic congestion and protect water systems” in Canadian cities. The Canadian Institute for Advanced Research will receive $93.7 million to “launch a Pan-Canadian Artificial Intelligence Strategy … (to) position Canada as a world-leading destination for companies seeking to invest in artificial intelligence and innovation.”For the first time, the government will also aim to promote economic growth through its purchases, by allocating $37.5 million to a new program called Innovative Solutions Canada, modeled on the U.S. Small Business Innovation Research Program. It will provide funding for things like late-stage prototypes and will aim in particular to support companies led by women and other underrepresented groups.Among more specific measures are vows to: Use $87.7 million in previous allocations to the Canada Research Chairs program to create 25 “Canada 150 Research Chairs” honoring the nation’s 150th year of existence, provide $1.5 million per year to support the operations of the office of the as-yet-unappointed national science adviser; provide $165.7 million over 5 years for the nonprofit organization Mitacs to create roughly 6300 more co-op positions for university students and grads, and provide $60.7 million over five years for new Canadian Space Agency projects, particularly for Canadian participation in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s next Mars Orbiter Mission.Perhaps anticipating the findings of Naylor’s review (which may already be in the government’s hands), the budget also vowed to this year assess operations at the National Research Council and to review “existing investments in federal science infrastructure, including federal laboratories and testing facilities.” OTTAWA—Wind chills here approached -30°C as Finance Minister Bill Morneau unveiled the Liberal government’s second budget on Wednesday. Spring may eventually arrive in Canada’s capital, but the deep freeze for Canada’s research community will continue into fiscal 2017–18 as the granting councils received no significant boosts in funding.Overall, Morneau’s budget proposes an $11.3 billion spending increase, to $247.7 billion. But at best, academic researchers can hope to tap modest monies either allocated or reprofiled for a bevy of national programs generally aimed at promoting “innovation,” particularly through partnerships between industry and universities, or from several smaller, boutique initiatives, such as one to develop a national action plan to respond to health risks posed by climate change.Finance officials, who speak on condition of anonymity during the budget lock-up, indicated the budgets of the granting councils, the main source of operational grants for university researchers, will be “static” until the government can assess recommendations that emerge from an expert panel formed in 2015 and headed by former University of Toronto President David Naylor to review basic science in Canada. Until then, the officials said, funding for the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) will remain at roughly $848 million, whereas that for the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) will remain at $773 million, and for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council at $547 million.center_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Canadian Finance Minister Bill Morneau tries on his new shoes—a budget day tradition—while meeting with children at Nelson Mandela Public Park School in Toronto. By Wayne KondroMar. 22, 2017 , 6:30 PMlast_img read more

first_img World’s tiniest 3D glasses reveal how praying mantises see the world Praying mantises are the only invertebrates known to see in 3D. The predatory insects excel at detecting prey that comes within striking distance, but—unlike us—their depth perception only works when the prey is moving. How do we know this? In a new study, scientists glued the world’s tiniest 3D glasses on 20 praying mantises (Sphodromantis lineola) and showed them a series of movies depicting patches of moving dots—potential “prey items”—camouflaged against a matching background. The insects tried to catch “prey” that appeared to be within 2.5 centimeters of their perch. And they could still do it even when the “prey” item—or dot configuration—looked completely different to the two eyes, something that people found challenging when they were asked to perform the same task, the team reports today in Current Biology. Humans see in 3D by stitching together the actual image coming in from one eye versus the other, but this work shows that praying mantises only bother stitching together the motion—the actual image doesn’t matter to them. It’s the first time this kind of 3D vision has been found in nature, and it’s yet another example of evolution coming up with different solutions to the same problem—in this case, when to strike at a passing fly. By Katie LanginFeb. 8, 2018 , 12:00 PMcenter_img Mike Urwin/Newcastle University last_img read more

first_img By Meredith WadmanFeb. 12, 2019 , 4:05 PM Measles cases have tripled in Europe, fueled by Ukrainian outbreak Measles is spread by respiratory droplets. Most people recover, but the disease can cause sometimes-fatal complications including pneumonia and inflammation of the brain. Typically, children are vaccinated around their first birthday and again before starting school. According to WHO, 95% of children need to be fully vaccinated to stop the disease from spreading.Elsewhere in Europe, vaccine skepticism has given the virus an opening. Cases in Greece doubled from 2017 to 2018; cases in France grew nearly sixfold. Meanwhile, the United States logged 372 cases last year. An outbreak in Washington this year has resulted in 53 confirmed cases as of 11 February, nearly all in unvaccinated children, pushing the U.S. year-to-date tally above 100.In the past decade, vaccine refusal has also played a big role in Ukraine. In 2008, a day after receiving the measles vaccine, a 17-year-old died—from an unrelated cause, according to WHO and the United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF). His death led to a huge loss of confidence among parents: Vaccination rates plunged from 97% of 1-year-olds in 2007 to 56% in 2010. Coverage then slowly improved, reaching 79% in 2012 and 2013.But in 2014, then-President Viktor Yanukovych was ousted after violent protests, Russia annexed Crimea, and armed conflict broke out in eastern Ukraine. Paralyzed, the government failed to order measles vaccine until late 2015. Because of shortages, in 2016, Ukraine vaccinated only 42% of its infants. And that year, just 31% of 6-year-olds received the recommended second measles shot—one of the lowest rates in the world.“If you have a high rate of unvaccinated children, you will face this kind of outbreak,” says Vusala Allahverdiyeva, a physician who is a technical officer in WHO’s Kyiv office.There are other problems, too. Authorities have grappled with basic challenges. Investigating an outbreak of 90 cases in children in a mountainous region in western Ukraine in 2018, MOH found the children had been vaccinated at a clinic that experienced frequent power outages and had no generator. (The vaccine must be stored at less than 8°C to be effective.)A faulty vaccine may also have played a role. According to MOH, more than 20,000 of those infected in 2018 were adults who would have been vaccinated decades ago with a Russian vaccine that was dropped in 2001. The ministry is trying to identify whether that vaccine was less effective in some years, with an eye to revaccinating those who received it.MOH has been striving to catch up. It is now procuring vaccine more cheaply through UNICEF, sending mobile vaccination brigades from school to school in Lviv, a hard-hit area, and preparing to provide cash incentives to Ukraine’s underpaid physicians to vaccinate all children in their practices. In 2017, the country’s coverage rebounded to 93% of infants and 91% of 6-year-olds.But because of Ukraine’s large pool of unvaccinated or undervaccinated people, the epidemic roars on. “We need to start thinking outside the box,” Suprun says. For instance, UNICEF is working with the government on a campaign urging grandparents, who often care for young children in Ukraine, to get their charges vaccinated.The Ukrainian outbreak caps a year in which measles cases surged around the globe. As of mid-January, WHO had received reports of more than 229,000 measles cases in 2018. The global number is expected to rise by the time it is finalized in June, but it’s already a 32% increase from 2017.“The root cause of the measles outbreaks … is a failure to adequately vaccinate,” says Katrina Kretsinger, the lead measles expert at WHO headquarters. “Many people in many countries remain susceptible, and large pockets of susceptible persons can lead to large outbreaks.” Julia Phil/Odessa city children’s hospital Measles cases more than tripled across Europe in 2018, and one country drove much of the surge: Ukraine. Nearly 83,000 cases of measles were reported in the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) European Region in 2018, compared with some 25,500 in 2017, WHO, headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland, announced last week. Ukraine had more than 54,000 cases in 2018, its government says. Last year, 16 Ukrainians died of the extremely contagious viral disease, which is easily prevented with a vaccine.“The current epidemic is the most massive in the entire postvaccine period,” says Nataliya Vynnyk, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Children’s Clinical Hospital in Kyiv. With more than 15,000 cases and seven deaths between 28 December 2018 and 1 February, according to the country’s Ministry of Health (MOH), the epidemic continues to worsen.Ukraine’s government is taking action. “It’s egregious to have people have measles in the 21st century in a European country,” says Ulana Suprun, a physician who has been Ukraine’s acting minister of health since August 2016. She blames a decade of corruption, war, a lack of political commitment to vaccination, and antivaccine sentiment. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)center_img Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe A nurse gives a child a measles shot at City Children’s Hospital in Odessa, Ukraine, in October 2018. 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first_imgA new Shaft movie is bringing audiences three iconic detectives for the price of one. The trailer for latest installment Shaft (formerly Son of Shaft) has premiered on Jimmy Kimmel Live, starring Samuel L. Jackson, Jessie Usher and original “bad mother…” Richard Roundtree.Samuel L. Jackson and Richard Roundtree. Photo by Tony Shek CC by 2.0Usher picks up the baton as John “JJ” Shaft III, an MIT-trained FBI agent and computer expert who turns to his father (Jackson) to help solve the case of his deceased best friend.Things haven’t been right between the pair for a while, and what better way for the family to reunite than over a few fights and explosions?Samuel L. Jackson. Photo by pinguino k CC BY 2.0According to Deadline, “while JJ’s own FBI analyst’s badge may clash with his dad’s trademark leather duster, there’s no denying family. Besides, Shaft’s got an agenda of his own, and a score to settle that’s professional and personal.”The trailer showcases a raft of quips, punches and clashes between the generations. “I’m an equal opportunity ass whooper!” Jackson exclaims, in response to his son’s horror over him fighting a woman.Directed by Tim Story (Barbershop) and written by Kenya Barris (Black-ish), the movie is produced by John Davis and based on characters created by Ernest Tidyman.Kenya Barris. Photo by Peabody Awards CC BY 2.0His novel inspired Gordon Parks’ 1971 blaxploitation classic, starring future grandfather Roundtree. The author wrote five Shaft books. His last was 1975’s The Last Shaft.Tidyman was white, but wanted to create a better black character than the ones on offer. Speaking to the LA Times in 1972 he revealed “The blacks I knew were smart and sophisticated, and I thought, what about a black hero who thinks of himself as a human being, but who uses his black rage as one of his resources, along with intelligence and courage.”Blackflix.com wrote, “The original John Shaft was the ‘black’ answer to James Bond. He made love and killed in the same afternoon and had a cool theme song. With his militant attitude and black leather trench coat, he flawlessly delivered unprintable one-liners and smooth Bogart comebacks.”Irish actor Pierce Brosnan as James Bond, in a publicity still for the film ‘GoldenEye’, c. 1995. He is holding his iconic Walther PPK with a silencer. Photo by Terry O’Neill/Iconic Images/Getty ImagesRoundtree wasn’t a fan of the term “blaxploitation”. He was quoted as saying, “I find that word offensive with anything that Gordon Parks has done. Exploitation, and then put black in front of it! That is a very ugly term from where I sit. And the ugliest part about it was the black press started it.”Nevertheless, Shaft became an icon. Two sequels were made, Shaft’s Big Score! (1972) and Shaft In Africa (1973). Isaac Hayes’ famous theme song has always accompanied the “cat who won’t cop out when there’s danger all about,” and is heard during the new trailer.Gordon ParksA short-lived TV version (1973-4) toned down the character and was criticized before director John Singleton got things back on track with Jackson in 2000. That same year Shaft was selected for preservation by the Library of Congress.While Jackson’s version of Shaft was lean and mean, he’s dialed it down almost 20 years on. “He’s mellowed a bit,” the actor told Entertainment Weekly in 2018. “He’s not quite as crazy and cynical. Maybe a bit more devil-may-care the last time we saw him. But still an extremely dangerous and funny character.”As with Roundtree, it’s hoped playing Shaft will turn Jessie Usher into a superstar. He’s best known for his role in Survivor’s Remorse and appeared in 2016’s Independence Day: Resurgence.He also took part in Creed II, another franchise (Rocky) that’s been brought back with a family twist. Shaft 2019 co-stars Regina Hall, Alexandra Shipp and Method Man.Read another story from us: You are Again in the Twilight Zone – New Reboot Setting its Sights Pretty HighThe New Line film opens the American Black Film Festival on June 12th before going on general release two days later. It will then hit Netflix later in the month.last_img read more

first_img Advertising Related News Maharashtra: Thrust on double farm production, higher income for farmers as state Cabinet clears MMSKY In fresh bureaucratic reshuffle, Mumbai Suburb gets new Collector The Maharashtra government reshuffled the bureaucrats on Tuesday.The Maharashtra government on Tuesday appointed Milind Borikar, Chief Executive Officer of Palghar Zilla Parishad, as the new Mumbai suburban collector. Outgoing suburban collector, Sachin Kurve, has been appointed a secretary in Chief Minister’s Office (CMO), officials said. Post Comment(s) By Express News Service |Mumbai | Published: July 17, 2019 3:21:00 am Maharashtra hospital shocker: Patient alive but “body” handed to kin In the bureaucratic reshuffle, Palghar collector Prashant Narnavre has been posted as the joint managing director of CIDCO, while A B Misal has been appointed as municipal commissioner of Navi Mumbai. Outgoing Navi Mumbai municipal commissioner Dr Ramaswami N has been posted as Commissioner (Labour) in Mumbai.Chief officer of MHADA Board, D S Kushwah, has been posted as Chief Executive Officer of Maharashtra Maritime Board replacing Radhakrishna B, who has been posted as CEO of MHADA.Dr N B Gitte, CEO of Nashik Zilla Parishad has been posted as Collector Bhandara; Ajit Patil has been posted Managing Director of Maharashtra Information Technology Corporation; Balaji Manjule, Collector of Nandurbar, has been posted as Commissioner of Tribal Research and Training Institute (Pune); Dhule Collector Rahul Rekhawar has been posted as Joint Managing Director of MAHADISCOM; Labour Commissioner R R Jadhav has been appointed Commissioner Fisheries; S R Daund, the Secretary and Special Enquiry Officer of GAD, has been posted as Divisional Commissioner of Konkan division; and Additional Tribal Commissioner of Amravati M J Pradip Chandren, has been posted as Additional Divisional Commissioner of Nashik. Night Patrol, Eye On Group Admins: Maharashtra Village Shows How To Tackle WhatsApp Rumours last_img read more

first_img USA, Iran, renews nuclear pact ultimatum, nuclear deal, world news, indian express a demonstrator holds an anti-U.S. placard during the annual Quds, or Jerusalem Day rally in Tehran, Iran.Iran will continue scaling back compliance with a nuclear deal unless other signatories to the pact show “positive signals”, the Iranian president said on Saturday as tensions with the United States escalated over tanker attacks in the Gulf region. Advertising Post Comment(s) Iran stopped complying in May with some commitments in the 2015 nuclear deal that was agreed with global powers after the United States unilaterally withdrew from the accord in 2018 and ratcheted up sanctions on Tehran.“Obviously, Iran cannot stick to this agreement unilaterally,” President Hassan Rouhani told Russian, Chinese and other Asian leaders at a conference in Tajikistan. His comments follow rising tensions with Washington, which has accused Tehran of carrying out Thursday’s attacks on two oil tankers in a vital oil shipping route at the mouth of the Gulf. Tehran has denied having any role.Rouhani did not refer to this week’s tanker incident in his speech to the Conference on Interaction and Confidence Building Measures in Asia, behind held in the Tajik capital Dushanbe.”It is necessary that all the sides of this agreement contribute to restoring it,” he said, adding that Iran needed to see “positive signals” from other signatories to the pact, which include Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. Hassan Rouhani says Iran ready to talk to US if sanctions lifted By Reuters |Dushanbe | Published: June 15, 2019 4:02:44 pm Advertising UK says seized Iranian oil tanker could be released He did not give details on what actions Iran would take or say what positive signals Tehran wanted to see. Russian President Vladimir Putin said Moscow would adhere to the agreement and urged other signatories to follow suit.“We believe that the only sensible decision is for all deal participants to honour commitments,” Putin told the conference. Tehran said in May that Iran would start enriching uranium at a higher level unless world powers protected its economy from U.S. sanctions within 60 days.Washington has ratcheted up pressure on Iran, saying it wants to prevent Tehran from developing a nuclear bomb, rein in its ballistic missile programme and end what it calls Iranian meddling in the Middle East.Tehran has said its nuclear programme is peaceful and will not be stopped, says its missile work is for defence and accuses the United States of destabilising France and other European signatories to the nuclear deal that aimed to curb Iran’s nuclear work, have said they wanted to save the accord, but many of their companies have cancelled deals with Tehran, under pressure from the United States. Related News With Iran deal teetering on brink, Europeans assess next steps last_img read more

first_img Related News Advertising Presenting the budget, Sitharaman had said, “The government is developing 17 iconic tourism sites into world-class destinations which will serve as a model for other tourism sites. The iconic tourism sites would enhance the visitor experience, which would lead to increase visits of both domestic and international tourists at these destinations”.As per a written reply given by then Tourism Minister K J Alphons, the 17 sites identified were Taj Mahal and Fatehpur Sikri in Uttar Pradesh; Ajanta and Ellora (Maharashtra); Humayun’s Tomb, Red Fort and Qutub Minar (Delhi); Colva Beach (Goa); Amer Fort (Rajasthan); Somnath and Dholavira (Gujarat); Khajuraho (Madhya Pradesh); Hampi (Karnataka); Mahabalipuram (Tamil Nadu); Assam- Kaziranga (Assam); Kumarakom (Kerala) and Mahabodhi (Bihar).“The ministry shall be developing the above sites in a holistic manner with a focus on issues concerning connectivity to the destination, better facilities/experience for the tourists at the site, skill development, the involvement of local community, promotion and branding and by bringing in private investment”, Alphons had said. Who is Biswa Bhushan Harichandran? Advertising How Odisha took bite out of malaria: strategy and ASHA soldiers on ground Written by Sampad Patnaik | Bhubaneshwar | Updated: July 10, 2019 12:33:38 pm Odisha gets highest ever railway allotment of Rs 5993 crore He further added, “The monuments taken up for development under the above-mentioned project fall under the jurisdiction of Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) and State Archaeology Departments. The ministry will carry out interventions at these monuments in collaboration with the ASI and State Government”.Calling the finance minister’s announcement “sad and astounding”, BJD Lok Sabha leader Pinaki Misra said, “How could the centre not select even one of the many (tourism) sites in Odisha? And why have they not acknowledged it as an old announcement instead of making it out to be an ‘iconic’ announcement?“They had promised in the manifesto to make Puri the spiritual capital of the country. What is the roadmap? The first step could have been to give it an Iconic status. There is definite justification for (inclusion of) Konark Temple”, Misra, the Puri MP said. He added that Khandagiri, Udaygiri Caves and the nesting beaches for Olive Ridley Turtles are not anywhere else in the world. “Of course, we will take it up with the (Central) Government”, Misra said.Speaking for BJP Odisha unit, Prithviraj Harichandan said, “The party will also draw the centre’s attention to this issue. Let the state government also do the same. There is no need for politicization of the matter”. It’s Odisha govt vs ASI over restoring Konark Sun Temple Konark Temple in Odisha  (File Photo)The reference to the development of 17 iconic tourism sites of India in Finance Minister Nirmala Sitharaman’s budget speech has garnered strong criticism from the BJD, as no monument from Odisha has made it to the list. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

first_img After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Advertising In an apparent sign of how quickly the United States has mobilised diplomatic efforts as the confrontation escalates, Pompeo thanked King Salman for meeting on “such short notice”.Pompeo and Prince Mohammed reiterated that the “two countries stand side by side in confronting the hostile Iranian activities and in combating terrorism”, the Saudi media ministry said.The United States has protected the strait for decades with its naval Fifth Fleet based in Bahrain. U.S. President Donald Trump said on Monday that other countries, including China and Japan, should protect their own ships there.“There will be military ships from foreign countries, from a broad coalition of countries who participate in this. I don’t think they’re escorting. I think they’re observing,” the U.S. official said.It was not clear what role Saudi Arabia and the UAE would play in the coalition. Relations between longtime foes Iran and the United States have deteriorated since Trump withdrew Washington a year ago from a 2015 accord that curbed Tehran’s nuclear programme in exchange for easing sanctions.Tensions have flared following the tankers attacks, Iran’s downing of the drone last week, and repeated attacks on Saudi airports and oil installations by Yemen’s Iran-aligned Houthis.KHASHOGGI MURDERPompeo did not discuss last year’s murder of U.S.-based Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi with Saudi Arabia’s king on Monday and it was unclear whether the issue was raised in a separate meeting with the crown prince.“It did not” come up, the official said of Pompeo’s meeting with the king. He could not confirm if the case was raised with the crown prince, whom Pompeo met later.A U.N. report last week called for the crown prince and other senior officials to be investigated, given credible evidence against them. The Trump administration is pressing the Saudis to show progress toward holding to account those behind the killing of Khashoggi in the kingdom’s Istanbul consulate. Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Taking stock of monsoon rain Best Of Express Advertising A senior U.S. State Department official said the United States is building a coalition with its allies to protect Gulf shipping lanes by having “eyes on all shipping” following recent attacks on oil tankers that Washington blamed on Iran.Pompeo arrived in the United Arab Emirates after meeting with King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in Saudi Arabia where talks covered protection for ships in the Gulf.Read More | In Mideast, Mike Pompeo seeks a global coalition against Iran Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield By Reuters |Dubai, Riyadh | Published: June 25, 2019 8:09:25 am The murder tarnished the crown prince’s international standing. The CIA and some Western countries believe he ordered the killing, which Saudi officials deny. Advertising India, US should embrace age of ambition, says Mike Pompeo “Freedom of navigation is paramount,” Pompeo tweeted from the Saudi city of Jeddah. The senior U.S. official told reporters en route to Abu Dhabi that the U.S. Navy was building a “Sentinel” programme for “proactive deterrence”. He said a coalition of nations would provide both material and financial contributions, but did not name the countries.“What the Iranians are doing by shooting down American drones, shooting at other drones in the region not even necessarily over the Gulf, anywhere, is to prevent us from having eyes on them,” the official said.A second U.S. official, also speaking on condition of anonymity, told Reuters that the plan aimed to see U.S. partners providing the majority of ships that would be positioned in intervals in the Gulf of Oman or the Strait of Hormuz, keeping watch.Also Read | Trump imposes new economic sanctions on Iran“It’s not in operation (yet) but it’s something we’re looking at with our partners,” the official said, describing the concept. In his meeting with Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan, Pompeo pressed him on increased maritime security in the Strait of Hormuz. Related News Mike Pompeo, Mike Pompeo in Saudi Arabia, US-Gulf Arab allies, US-Iran relation, US-Iran, US Iran ties, Military strike, gulf arab allies, uae, Donald Trump, Saudi Arabia, Oil tankers attacks, World news, Indian Express Pompeo and Prince Mohammed reiterated that the “two countries stand side by side in confronting the hostile Iranian activities and in combating terrorism”, the Saudi media ministry said. (File)U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo discussed Iran and maritime security with rich Gulf Arab allies during a trip to the region on Monday after President Donald Trump called off a military strike to retaliate for Tehran’s downing of a U.S. drone. Let’s speak out in favour of religious freedom: Pompeo on his India visit “We’ll need you all to participate, your military folks,” Pompeo said. “The President is keen on sharing that the United States doesn’t bear the cost of this,” he added, noting that the UAE, Saudi Arabia and “another 20 countries” would “need to help advance” the exercise.Tehran has denied any involvement in the explosive blasts that have hit six vessels, including two Saudi oil tankers, near the Strait of Hormuz, through which almost a fifth of the world’s oil passes.The U.S. official said the deterrents include cameras, binoculars and ships, including from the United States.Mike Pompeo, Mike Pompeo in Saudi Arabia, US-Gulf Arab allies, US-Iran relation, US-Iran, US Iran ties, Military strike, gulf arab allies, uae, Donald Trump, Saudi Arabia, Oil tankers attacks, World news, Indian Express Pompeo and Prince Mohammed reiterated that the “two countries stand side by side in confronting the hostile Iranian activities and in combating terrorism”, the Saudi media ministry said. (File)MOBILISING ALLIES India-US ties: Pompeo says great friends disagree, Jaishankar firm on S-400 deal More Explained Post Comment(s)last_img read more

first_imgBy PTI |New Delhi | Published: July 14, 2019 4:25:04 pm Scrap Triple Talaq Bill, send for review: Muslim women’s rights body in charter of demands ahead of Lok Sabha polls The three-year term of the 21st Law Commission ended on August 31 last year. On at least one occasion, the Law Ministry had moved the proposal to reconstitute the panel.But the proposal could not move further and the government later went into election mode. Sources in the government said the proposal to reconstitute the panel would be before the Union Cabinet in the next few days.The 21st commission, under Justice B S Chauhan (retd), had submitted reports and working papers on key issues such as simultaneous polls to the Lok Sabha and state assemblies and a uniform civil code. Advertising Related News On the Loose: God’s Plan Frivolous cases should not reach apex court: AG to additional solicitors general It is usually headed by a retired Supreme Court judge or a former chief justice of a high court. (File)With the country without a Law Commission since September last year, the Law Ministry has initiated the process of setting up the body which gives advice to the government on complex legal issues. Government sought legal opinion on changes to sedition law, told necessary, go by Supreme Court Post Comment(s) Advertising While the Law Commission had supported simultaneous polls, it had said time is not ripe for a common code. The cabinet approves reconstitution of the law panel for a period of three years.It is usually headed by a retired Supreme Court judge or a former chief justice of a high court.In 2015, a proposal was mooted to make the law panel into a permanent body either through an Act of Parliament or an executive order (resolution of the Union Cabinet).The move was shelved after the Prime Minister’s Office felt that the present system should continue.In 2010 also, the then UPA government had prepared a draft cabinet note to give statutory status to the Law Commission and the Law Ministry had mooted to bring the Law Commission of India Bill, 2010. But the idea was shelved.last_img read more

first_img Best Of Express Nicolas Maduro, venezuela, venezuela president, venezuela crisis, Juan Guaido, venezuela socialist party, world news Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro (Source: Carlos Becerra/Bloomberg)Venezuela’s opposition will meet with representatives of President Nicolas Maduro’s government in Barbados for talks mediated by Norway, the parties involved said Sunday, as part of efforts to resolve an ongoing political crisis. Information Minister Jorge Rodriguez on Twitter posted the statement by Norway’s government. His office did not reply to a request for comment.Guaido in January invoked the constitution to assume a rival presidency after dismissing Maduro’s 2018 re-election as a fraud. He does not control state institutions, largely because the country’s military continues to back Maduro.As a stalemate was setting in by May, Guaido’s allies reluctantly agreed to hold talks in Oslo.Many in the opposition mistrust dialogue proceedings given that previous efforts ended without agreement and Maduro’s critics broadly saw them as a stalling tactic. Norway says Venezuela opposition and government talks to continue Opposition leader Juan Guaido, who has been recognized as Venezuela’s rightful leader by more than 50 governments, has said any talks must lead to a sustained solution to the crisis and cannot be used by the Socialist Party to buy time.“The Venezuelan people, our allies and the world’s democracies recognize the need for a truly free and transparent electoral process that will allow us to surpass the crisis and built a productive future,” Guaido’s office said in a statement.Norway’s government in a statement said the talks would take place this week. Advertising By Reuters |Caracas | Published: July 8, 2019 7:37:21 am Related News NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home center_img Sources in June had told Reuters that opposition representatives were preparing another round of talks.Maduro on Friday defended the Norway-backed dialogue process, while Guaido the same day said there would never be a good moment to mediate “with kidnappers, human rights violators, and a dictatorship.” Advertising In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Post Comment(s) Disappointed Venezuelans lose patience with Guaido as Maduro hangs on Third round of Venezuela talks to start as soon as next week last_img read more