first_imgEven before the COVID-19 pandemic, families and young people struggled to find time in their busy schedules to be outside. Coined in 2005 by Richard Louv, nature-deficit disorder is a nonmedical term used to describe the disconnect more and more humans are experiencing with nature. Hunter-gatherer and agrarian societies were directly tied to the land. With the industrial age and advancements in technology over the last two centuries, humans are spending less time outside and more time on electronic devices.When young people spend time outdoors, they gain a greater appreciation for the natural resources around them. They can explore and be creative and curious — whether that means observing a worm wiggling on the pavement, looking at the different shapes of tree leaves or spending time digging in the dirt. A growing body of research suggests that there are numerous physical and mental health benefits to spending time outside, such as reduced stress, greater cognitive functioning and increased physical activity.Technology is powerful. Children and youth can read books, listen to podcasts, access the news, watch educational videos and even play cognitive games. These devices have been a tool during this time of quarantine and social distancing, connecting friends and family members through online meeting spaces. With many school systems switching their delivery mode to a virtual or hybrid model, there is even more concern for young people to have intentional time for screen disengagement. The following are some easy ways to take breaks from screen time. Make time to be outside. Can youth take their devices outdoors for instruction time? Can they read a book sitting on a bench in the public park or build a homework fort in the backyard? Finding intentional ways for kids to be outside while completing their required studies can help provide clarity and focus.Schedule breaks. Sitting in front of a screen for too long can cause eye strain and anxiety. If children are participating in virtual education, consider building in time for breaks. Even a quick stretch or walk around the block can increase their focus once resuming a task. Using a timer or device to schedule breaks can add fun and spontaneity.Involve the entire family. Instead of a Friday night movie, plan a hike instead. Create a fun and healthy snack to enjoy on a blanket in the backyard instead of eating at the kitchen table. Could you meet a relative or friend at the park for a picnic dinner? Engage in a civic science project — like monitoring the weather — that families can complete together.Allow unstructured play. It’s great for kids to complete an outdoor scavenger hunt or try to identify birds based on their songs and calls, but allowing some unstructured playtime outside encourages exploration. If the environment is safe, have young people simply wander and use their observation skills. Turn over a fallen log and see what is living under there. Dig in a hole in the dirt and feel the soil. Run around and enjoy the natural surroundings.At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic in the U.S., Richard Louv, co-founder of the Children and Nature Network, compiled a list of activities to help families at childrenandnature.org.As with anything, having an intentional approach is the key to success. Start with small, incremental changes and track your family’s progress over time. Involve children and youth in the decision-making process — perhaps they have some ideas of their own. Helping young people to realize that technology can be beneficial but must be balanced with outdoor time is critical to their development.last_img read more

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first_imgFacebook Google LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Log in with your social account press-freedom press-freedom-in-Indonesia omnibus-bill-on-job-creation Press-Council AJI Linkedin Forgot Password ? Media groups have questioned the proposed revisions to the Press Law set out in the omnibus bill on job creation, fearing that the new provisions will lead to a setback in press freedom.The Press Council said on Thursday that the government had not consulted them about the bill.“[The government] should have spoken with the Press Council and other stakeholders if they wanted to make a revision to the press law. But we have not been involved to date,” Press Council member in charge of complaint and press ethics enforcement Arif Zulkifli told The Jakarta Post Thursday.Legal Aid Institute for the Press (LBH Pers) advocacy chief Gading Yonggarditya said public participation was a legal aspect of the legislative process.The omnibus bill seeks to amend Article 11 and 18 of Law No. 40/1999 on the press.Article 11 of the Press Law states foreign investmen… Topics :last_img read more

first_imgDavid Charles Lowery, of Metamora, was born on June 30, 1947 in Ohio, a son to Charles and Hazel Brumley Lowery.  He was a Vietnam veteran, serving his country with the United States Marines.  David married his high school sweetheart, Wanda Wilson on June 15, 1968 in Metamora and together they raised two children; Troy and Lacy Lowery, and Kim and Darin Mathews.  He worked at Ford in Connersville for 39 years.  David loved spending time with his grandkids and great-grandkids and also enjoyed fishing and golfing.  On Thursday, August 27, 2020 at the age of 73, he passed away after a short illness at University of Cincinnati Hospital.  David will be greatly missed by both his family and church family.Besides his wife and children, he is survived by grandchildren, Courtney McGuire, Charity(Bretly) Jett, Jasmine (Andy) Patton, Trey (Allison) Lowery, Chandler (Victoria) Mathews, Abigayle Lowery and Richard Lowery; great-grandchildren, Audri, Makeena, Alexandria, Braxton, Maddox, Grayson and Bowdrie, and siblings, Danny (Kathy) Lowery, Janet (Russell) Palmer, Sandy (Bill) Treadway, and Rita (Frank) Rogers. He was preceded in death by his parents; one brother, Richard Lowery and father-in-law, Albert (Buck) Wilson.Friends may visit with the family on Sunday, August 30, 2020 from 2 until 6 p.m. at Metamora Church of God.  The funeral service will be held on Monday at 12 noon also at the church and burial will follow in Trinity Full Gospel Church cemetery.To sign the online guestbook or to leave a personal condolence, please visit www.cookrosenberger.com.  The staff of Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home is honored to care for the family of David Lowery.last_img read more

first_imgNeymar has played only four matches for Paris Saint-Germain since he injured his right foot’s fifth metatarsal in January. Striker Gabriel Jesus said Neymar “obviously is not 100%, but he is at 90%.” “He is doing well, which is great for us,” Jesus told a news conference.Neymar was also stripped of the captaincy by coach Tite this week, but neither spoken publicly about the decision yet. Veteran defender Dani Alves will wear the armband during the Copa America. For all the Latest Sports News News, Football News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. Brazil: Neymar sat out Brazil’s training session, a day after he limped off the field with knee pains as the team began its Copa America preparations. Brazil’s soccer confederation said in a statement that the striker would undergo physiotherapy and gym sessions instead of practicing with the rest of the team at the Granja Comary training ground outside Rio de Janeiro.The 27-year-old exited Tuesday’s first full training after feeling pain in his left knee. He is still expected to play a friendly against Qatar on June 5 in Brasilia. The Copa America starts on June 14, with Brazil playing Bolivia on the opening day.last_img read more