first_imgCategories: Editorial, OpinionI have a New Year’s confession.I retweeted President Donald Trump with approval, not something I had expected to do, especially on the subject of Iran.But Trump has been right to get behind the brave Iranian protesters calling for political and economic change. These are the largest popular protests since the Iranian uprising in 2009 against a fraudulent election. I was in an enormous crowd (estimated in the millions) that marched from Tehran’s Enghelab (Revolution) Square to Azadi (Freedom) Square three days after the vote.Fear evaporated in that throng.I asked a young woman to whom I’d been talking what her name was. “My name is Iran,” she replied. The memory still gives me goose bumps.For a few days, the Islamic republic stood on a knife’s edge.I have often asked myself what would have happened if Mir Hussein Moussavi, the leader of the reformist Green Movement who was later placed under house arrest, had told that crowd to march on the seats of power in the name of the ballot box over theocratic whim.Signs of disarray were palpable before the regime led by Ayatollah Ali Khamenei cracked down through the thugs of the Basij militia. The tweet in question read:  As I wrote at the time, “There’s nothing more repugnant than seeing women being hit by big men armed with clubs and the license of the state.”In Tehran, then, the silence of the Obama White House was deafening: too little, too late. Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton expressed regret over this in 2014.Excessive caution was the mother of the Obama administration’s worst failures, not least in Syria.The slippery slope school of foreign policy has its limitations. Inaction, in the name of the ninth unanswerable “And then what?” question from the president, is as emphatic a statement as action.President Vladimir Putin, among other American rivals, took note.So Trump — even if he understands little or nothing of Iran, even if his talk of Iranian “human rights” sounds hollow from a sometime advocate of torture, even if his support of the Iranian people today is grotesque from the man who has wrongheadedly barred most Iranians from entering the United States — is right to speak up in solidarity and tweet that the “wealth of Iran is being looted” by a “brutal and corrupt Iranian regime.” It is.Given where American-Iranian relations stand, there is not much downside to this bluntness. The Revolution that promised Iranians freedom in 1979 has withered.The monopoly of force will probably be enough to sustain the Islamic republic.A crackdown is probable at some point. The real crisis of the regime will likely come at the moment of Khamenei’s succession.Still, the courage of Iranians should never be underestimated, nor the deep roots of their quest for freedom, and anything is possible.What has not changed since 2009 is the bravery of Iranians.I watched in awe as women stood their ground and faced down baton-wielding police officers.Today, protesters are chanting that Khamenei should go. They are chanting death to the Revolutionary Guards. They are chanting, “Independence, freedom, Iranian republic.” Among the most powerful slogans of demonstrators have been those expressing fury at money wasted in Syria, Lebanon and elsewhere when President Hassan Rouhani had promised jobs, not more of the surrogate wars of the Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps.The demonstrations, this time, are different.They are smaller, but more widespread. They reflect the economic woes of the working class more than middle-class disaffection.They are happening, as Karim Sadjadpour has pointed out in The Atlantic, in an Iran of 48 million smartphones, against fewer than 1 million in 2009 (which is why the regime is trying to block the hugely popular Telegram messaging app).They originated in Mashhad and went on to Qom, two traditional regime strongholds — a sign of the regime’s ideological bankruptcy.The West-leaning middle class, fed up with the hypocrisy of the mullahs, has long sought political change.But the working class has been a pillar of the regime — manipulated with handouts and slogans. If they have shifted now, all the aging Khamenei has left is the Revolutionary Guards and the Basij. Trump’s White House should keep up the pressure.It should bring European allies in behind its condemnation and warnings.It should stop berating the nuclear deal, which gave Iranians hope and deprives the regime of a convenient scapegoat (it could always say times were hard because of Western sanctions).It should not, whatever happens, impose new sanctions: They only benefit the Revolutionary Guards.And it should learn, finally, that Iran is not, as Steve Bannon told Joshua Green, “like the fifth century — completely primeval” — but rather a sophisticated society of deep culture full of unrealized promise better served by engagement than estrangement.Roger Cohen is an op-ed columnist with the International New York Times.More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

first_imgRicarda Kiessling’s last-second strike denied China are second straight win in Group D to secure a 1-1 draw for Germany at Bayil Stadium.Germany, who have won six of their seven opening-round games at FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cups, could have assured themselves of a place in the Azerbaijan 2012 quarter-finals had they continue that form.Predictably, the Germans came out strong against the Chinese. Vivien Bell tried a shot from distance in the early minutes, but Chinese goalkeeper Lu Feifei was equal to the task.After seven minutes, Zhang Chen created the first dangerous moment for the German defence with a mazy run into the box, but her efforts were eventually halted by the lunging Lena Luckel. The Chinese only had to wait until the 12th minute to get the game’s opening goal. Miao Siwen picked up a fine pass from Li Mengwen before hammering a powerful shot from 20 yards into the top corner.The half finished with a high tempo which bled straight into the second period, with China making the more impressive headway. Germany on the other hand struggled to make an impact against a well-organised defence.The introduction of striker Venus El-Kassem with 15 minutes to go improved their efforts, forcing Feifei into a save, but was taken off soon after through injury. This saw replacement Kiessling step up to the plate and nod home a free-kick with 94 minutes on the clock to save a point. The quote“We are very happy with this result. In the second half we put a lot of effort towards finding an equaliser and finally were rewarded at the end of the game. China, as we expected, were a strong opponent and they played very well.” Anouschka Bernhard, Germany coachlast_img read more