first_img X 00:00 /01:32 Ed MayberryLars Gert Lose is the Ambassador of Denmark to the United StatesLars Lose was appointed to his post just over a year ago, after having served as foreign policy adviser for the Danish prime minister. A typical day for the ambassador revolves around promoting trade opportunities with Denmark, as well as working with Washington on fighting terrorism and dealing with conflicts around the world.“I think the idea of an ambassador making, you know, secret deals in dark corners, smoke-filled dark corners of the room — those days are gone,” Lose said. “What we do today is we do a lot of commercial work. I think about 60 percent of my time is helping Danish businesses getting established in the, in the U.S.”But the job also centers on diplomatic work on security and foreign policy, “talking to people in the State Department and the White House — coordinating,” Lose said. “Denmark is a very transatlantic country, together with the UK, probably the most transatlantic country in Europe. We are firmly anchored in NATO and cooperate with the U.S. whenever we can.”  Lose was in Houston to talk to the Houston Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas about trade opportunities between Texas and Denmark. There’s a significant presence of Danish businesses here.“We actually have 655 Danish companies in the U.S., creating more than 62,000 jobs in the U.S.I think it’s pretty for a small country like Denmark, and Houston is the cornerstone in all that. Ten percent of the Danish companies have a presence here, so it’s really important to Denmark. We create jobs for more than 5,000 people in Texas.”Denmark is one of 92 countries with consulates here in Houston. Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Sharelast_img read more

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. 7 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. January 30, 2017 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Cybersecurity is on the minds of most businesses today, but there’s one area where companies often screw up: failing to protect their key executives when they’re on the move.In today’s environment, there are an abundance of well-funded and sophisticated hacking groups out there, many with nation-state or organized crime affiliations and interests, who are looking for any way possible to defraud or steal information from American business interests. Like any other criminal, hackers look for weaknesses in the security perimeter before they attack — and often, that sweet spot is to be found in the personal security of key company figures. One example is “Darkhotel,” the Korean-speaking hacking group that targeted countless business executives via hotel Wi-Fi from 2010 to 2015.As a former Secret Service agent, it was my job to protect the President from both physical and digital attacks. (Few realize this, but the USSS was one of the first federal agencies to develop a strong cyber defense and intelligence unit.) From a cyber standpoint, this meant implementing a robust security perimeter around the President’s personal devices and communications (e.g. stripping down the phone, limiting access, multiple layers of encryption, constant monitoring and defense), particularly when the President was outside of the White House.Businesses, from startups to Fortune 500s, need to adopt a similar mindset when it comes to their own commanders-in-chief, because cyber attacks are a low-cost, low-risk way to steal intellectual property, business intelligence and ultimately the company’s money — and the C-suite (along with other key figures, like a head engineer or programmer) is definitely a focal point for criminals.Related: 7 Habits of Highly Hackable EmployeesConsider these statistics:Business email compromise (BEC) scams on executives have grown steadily since 2010. According to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center, this type of attack increased by 1,300 percent from January 2015 to June 2016. More than 14,000 U.S. companies fell victim, with total losses estimated at over $960 million, between 2013 and 2016.Spear-phishing criminals are honing in on smaller companies. In 2015, 43 percent of targeted attacks focused on small businesses, as opposed to 35 percent for large enterprises, according to Symantec’s Internet Security Threat Report.American businesses lose $300 billion annually due to intellectual property theft, according to the Commission on the Theft of American Intellectual Property.Cybercrime is on the verge of becoming the number one economic crime for U.S. businesses, reaching 54 percent of organizations reporting such a crime in 2016, according to PwC’s Global Economic Crime Survey.No business can be fully secure unless it is taking ample steps to protect the digital assets of its leadership. Here are six steps to take:1. Whitelist the email.Only a small, select group of people should be allowed to email key executives; all other addresses should be blocked. Known as email “whitelisting,” this greatly reduces the risk of phishing attacks on the executive.Additionally, use strong anti-malware and anti-phishing solutions to boost the executive’s email security.2. Use multiple layers of encryption. Every VIP should be protected by multiple layers of encryption. This acts as a fail-safe in the event that an attacker breaks through the other defenses.Every device that connects to Wi-Fi (phone, tablet, laptop, desktop) must have a VPN, or virtual private network, which will encrypt all data in transit. Next, a full-disk or file encryption program should be used to secure data that is stored on these devices. Limit the executive’s communications to encrypted channels only, like PGP for email, or encrypted communications like Wickr Pro. All web sessions need to be done over HTTPS (SSL/TLS encryption); there are browser plugins like EFF’s HTTPS Everywhere that will force a secure connection on every website.Related: The Biggest Bounties Facebook, Microsoft and More Have Paid Hackers3. Strip down the phone.Just as the U.S. President uses a smartphone with very limited functionality, a business executive’s phone should also be stripped down as much as possible, with only essential functionality as needed. The more boring it is, the better.That means eliminating all non-essential apps, especially games, scaling back the phone’s connectivity options by disabling Bluetooth, disabling Wi-Fi auto-connect and turning off geolocation sharing for all apps (with the exception of “Find My Phone”). Social media can also pose a risk, but if your business depends on using it, at the very least make sure geolocation data is turned off in the app (there are online tools that can track a user based on this data) and be careful about oversharing, as sensitive information can be used against executives and employees in social engineering attacks. Also, use public Wi-Fi sparingly, even when a VPN is utilized.4. Use a burner device.Executives are most at risk when traveling overseas, particularly to countries like China and Russia. When making these trips, it’s important to be a little paranoid.Burner devices, or “phones to go,” are an effective way of reducing the risk from compromised devices. This isn’t cheap, but it’s worth the investment and inconvenience. Malware and man-in-the-middle (MiTM) attacks are more likely during foreign stays, so by putting aside the phone or laptop after a trip, the executive will prevent an infected device from getting “behind the firewall” after he or she returns.It’s also important to have a remote lock/erase feature installed on all devices in case they are lost or stolen.Related: Before You Use Public Wi-Fi, Read This5. Harden the home office network.Home offices can be an easy target for hackers, since they are likely to have less security than the corporate office.At a minimum, make sure a robust firewall and antivirus/anti-malware agents have been installed. Also, keep all devices (laptop, desktop, server, Wi-Fi router) fully updated on software/firmware settings, security patches, etc. Next, reduce the attack surface on the laptop or desktop by disabling Java, JavaScript and ActiveX, or by adding script-blocking plugins. Set up application whitelisting so that only pre-approved applications and processes can run on these machines. Eliminate Wi-Fi as much as possible by using an ethernet cable instead. It’s also wise to have two internet lines — one for the family and one exclusively for the executive. Use an outbound firewall to block any malware or malicious programs that do sneak in from being able to connect to the internet. DNS security tools (such as OpenDNS) will further protect the internet connection and block malicious or suspect domains.6. Contain the internet of things.Most executives have — or will have — “smart” devices in their homes, in addition to connected cars, wearables and other internet of things products.These complicate the security picture, as many IoT products have been found to be vulnerable to hackers. Limit IoT usage to only well established, trusted brands with a proven track record of security. Avoid installing IoT apps on the work phone. Also, keep these devices off the executive’s home Wi-Fi network — if you have two internet lines installed, relegate them to the all-purpose/family network.An executive’s personal security can be the Achilles’ heel of any company, from startup to Fortune 500, so it’s critical to implement a defense-in-depth approach that will keep their digital assets safe. Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

first_imgFebruary 5, 2018 This story originally appeared on PCMag Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global If you haven’t seen it by now, Amazon’s Super Bowl LII commercial is fairly clever. Kudos to the company for coming up with a fun way to mash together celebrities and Alexa without it feeling overly cheesy or trying-too-hard. More importantly, a big thanks to Amazon’s engineers who came up with an ingenious way to broadcast the “A word” without it triggering everyone’s Echos — whatever version of the device you own.The most annoying thing about watching any YouTube video or televised commercial that mentions Alexa is that it typically triggers your Echo device to get ready to respond to a query. Or worse, the person you’re watching who says “Alexa” just keeps on babbling, which then makes your Echo do something you didn’t want it to do — or just apologize for being unable to do whatever commands it tried to interpret.And since Amazon definitely wanted its Super Bowl LII to mention she-who-shall-not-be-named, and refer to her frequently, the company had to come up with a different way to do so in order to avoid hacking off everyone who already owns an Echo device.The solution? Acoustic fingerprinting.”The trick is to suppress the unintentional waking of a device while not incorrectly rejecting the millions of people engaging with Alexa every day,” said Shiv Vitaladevuni, a senior manager on the Alexa Machine Learning team, in an Amazon blog post.Though Amazon isn’t detailing the specific techniques its using to keep your Echo from triggering from its Super Bowl advertising, Bloomberg notes that a Reddit user, Asphyhackr, might have figured out Amazon’s secret.”I did a little research tonight and found that the Echo, while it’s processing the wake word, searches the Audio Spectrum and if is significantly quieter in the area of 4000hz to 5000hz, she will not wake for the word,” Asphyhackr writes.”I found that when I analyzed the spectrum of them saying her name, the spectrums were significantly quieter in the range of 3000hz to 6000hz. In some of those recordings, those frequencies appeared to be non-existent. In others it appeared like the boosted the surrounding frequencies to make the Echo see a gap in the spectrum.”In other words, if your Echo (Best Price at Amazon) notices something strange happening in the audio spectrum, it realizes that it should ignore whatever is being said — like “Alexa.” And while this works well when Amazon has a planned announcement to make, like an advertisement, the company has to get a bit more creative when it can’t anticipate the large-scale broadcast of its digital helper’s name.”When multiple devices start waking up simultaneously from a broadcast event, similar audio is streaming to Alexa’s cloud services. An algorithm within Amazon’s cloud detects matching audio from distinct devices and prevents additional devices from responding. The dynamic fingerprinting isn’t perfect, but as many as 80 to 90 percent of devices won’t respond to these broadcasts thanks to the dynamic creation of the fingerprints,” reads Amazon’s blog. 3 min read Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more