Given his reputation as a dual-threat QB, it might surprise you (it surprised us) that Watson led a pass-first offense last year, averaging almost double the yards through the air (334) as on the ground (170). According to expected points added, Clemson’s passing game generated 9.1 more points per contest than its rushing attack. Fast forward to 2017, and the offense has changed its focus, winning with a dominating run game. As a team, the Tigers are rushing for 105 yards more a game than last year, causing their offensive EPA to tilt in favor of the running game by 10 points per game.After serving as Watson’s understudy for his first two years, junior quarterback Kelly Bryant has been a driving force behind this change in playing style. Bryant is notching 25 yards more on the ground per game than Watson did last season. And he already has seven rushing touchdowns — Watson scored nine all of last season.It’s not been all about the offense, though. Defensive holdovers Austin Bryant and Dorian O’Daniel have helped Clemson’s D generate 6.1 more EPA per game in 2017 than it did last year. And unlike the offense, the Tigers’ defense has improved against both the pass and the run, cutting their points allowed per game almost in half to just 9.2.Swinney’s greatest coaching feat may come soon if Clemson continues winning. So few coaches in the game have shown the ability to continue winning amid a drastic change in playing style — Nick Saban and his recent rotating stable of quarterbacks at Alabama come to mind. And, not coincidentally, Saban — whose Alabama teams faced off against Clemson in the past two title games — will likely be waiting for him in the College Football Playoff. Undefeated and ranked No. 2 in the AP poll, the defending champion Clemson Tigers are roughly a third of the way to reaching this season’s college football national title game. It would be their third straight trip. That’s hard to do, so much so that no college football team has made it to three in a row since the Florida State Seminoles did so from 1998 to 2000.On Saturday, Dabo Swinney’s 4-0 Tigers will travel to Virginia Tech for what may be their toughest — and most important — game until the playoff bracket is decided. And they’re already coping with one major change in 2017 from the school’s last two dominating teams: Deshaun Watson now plays for the Houston Texans. But despite the departure of the superlative quarterback, Clemson has managed to survive by transforming the strength of its offense overnight.Heading into 2017, you couldn’t be blamed for thinking Watson’s production would be sorely missed. After all, he averaged 5,218 total yards in his last two seasons at Clemson — 4,351 yards passing and 867 yards running. And as we’ve previously noted, it’s difficult for teams to maintain offensive efficiency the season after losing their starting quarterback. But Clemson hasn’t missed a beat on offense. The Tigers are averaging 37.8 points per game through four games, compared with 39.2 for all of last season, and that includes a 14-6 dogfight with the Auburn Tigers in Week 2. So how has Clemson managed to play so well despite losing their talismanic quarterback? read more

You’re reading Significant Digits, a daily digest of the telling numbers tucked inside the news.2-1The semifinal game between England and Japan ended in heartbreak for Britons, with an own-goal in stoppage time ending the Lionesses’ run. [ESPN FC] 600 feetComet 67P, where the European Space Agency sent the Rosetta probe and harpooned a lander, is littered with massive sinkholes 600 feet deep. I’m pretty sure this renders the “drillers have to become astronauts to dig 800 feet into an asteroid” plot of “Armageddon” effectively moot. Finally, science standing up to a Michael Bay movie. [The Los Angeles Times]$45 millionThe campaign of Hillary Clinton raised about $45 million since its launch, which is a stack of dough the size of an incumbent president’s. At press time, Iowa local TV news station owners were presumably checking if a shiny new Doppler radar is eligible for Amazon Prime. [ABC News]$935 millionOne side effect of all those comic book movies we keep seeing is that comic book sales are bananas again. Last year they hit mid-1990s sales levels, after adjusting for inflation. About $835 million came from physical sales of comic books and graphic novels and another $100 million from digital sales. [Comichron]$1.9 billionPuerto Rico paid the $1.9 billion debt service payment it owed Wednesday, averting a deeper fiscal crisis in the U.S. territory that owes $73 billion total. [CNBC] 5.3 percent“Magic Mike XXL” is out in theaters, and you should see it both because Channing Tatum has abs that can probably open jars, and because “Magic Mike” was actually a pretty accurate look into a crucial sector of the American economy. The strip club industry derives 5.3 percent of its revenue from women. [FiveThirtyEight]44 yearsSonia Manzano has played Maria on Sesame Street for 44 years, but that tenure is coming to an end. She announced that she’s going to retire from the beloved children’s television program after this season. [The AV Club] 250 studentsSweet Briar University, a private all-women’s college in Virginia, was saved from closing after a dedicated alumni campaign. Still, the premature closing announcement meant that only 250 students will be returning to campus this fall, down from 561 students last year. [Bloomberg] Saturday is Independence Day in the U.S. and tomorrow is a company holiday, so we’re off and you’re without a newsletter. Have a good holiday weekend everybody, be cool around the fireworks and don’t do anything too stupid. See you on Monday. If you haven’t already, you really need to sign up for the Significant Digits newsletter — be the first to learn about the numbers behind the news. 54 yearsThe U.S. is going to have an embassy in Cuba again, and vice versa, after 54 years of no diplomatic ties. [USA Today]67 percent It’s the United States versus Japan in the final of the FIFA Women’s World Cup this Sunday. According to our model, the United States is favored to win the match and the tournament with a 67 percent chance of victory. Still, don’t get too cocky: Japan should still win this game one out of three times. If you want a primer on the team, definitely check out Allison McCann talking to current members of the squad from earlier in the tournament. [FiveThirtyEight] If you see a significant digit in the wild, tweet it to me, @WaltHickey. read more

OSU then-sophomore Taylor White (21) makes a catch during a game against Penn State on April 6 at Buckeye Field. Credit: Lantern file photoThe Ohio State softball team (15-7) opens Big Ten play this weekend with a road series against Maryland (7-20-1).The Buckeyes enter conference play battle tested after a 22-game nonconference schedule, which included seven games against current top-25 teams. OSU saw victory in just one of those games — a 10-2 win over No. 25 North Carolina — but the difficult schedule will help the team in the long run, sophomore outfielder Bri Betschel said.“I think it helps us know the ability we have with our team,” she said. “We’ve not always come out with what we’ve wanted, but at the end of the game we know that we can compete with these teams and that we can win the big games.”Though the Buckeyes are just 1-6 against ranked teams this season, they have taken care of business against inferior opponents thus far, losing just once to an unranked team with that lone loss coming to Louisville, which received votes in the latest ESPN.com/USA Softball poll.The same cannot be said of Maryland. The Terrapins lost 20 of their first 28 games, and 14 of those losses were against unranked opponents.Despite its lackluster record and bad losses, Maryland has proven itself dangerous, even to the nation’s top teams. Earlier this season, the Terrapins handed top-ranked Florida its only loss of the season on its home field.Since it’s a conference matchup, the Buckeyes will face off against Maryland in a three-game series this weekend, which is a change of pace from what OSU has seen so far this season. Previously, the Buckeyes have played each team just once.“Weekend series definitely have a different feel,” OSU coach Kelly Schoenly said. “It’s a little bit more of a chess match and paying attention to the small details you might be able to exploit.”Maryland is just the first of eight series the Buckeyes face as part of their Big Ten conference slate. Though OSU is not slated to face No. 8 Minnesota or No. 21 Wisconsin during the regular season, the team does have one ranked opponent left on its schedule: No. 18 Michigan.Obviously, OSU wanted to do well during nonconference play, but now that Big Ten play is beginning and conference records and standings will start to count, there’s a little more to play for.“I think every game is important to us as a team,” Betschel said. “But going into Big Tens, it’s a little bit more intense.”The Buckeyes will look to channel that intensity into wins this weekend before playing at home for the first time on Wednesday when they host Wright State. read more

The Ohio State men’s soccer team headed to Dayton this weekend to take part in a two game tournament.The Buckeyes faced off against Marshall on Friday, and Milwaukee on Sunday, losing both contests by a score of 1-0.As has been the story throughout the early part of this season, the Buckeye offense created chances for itself in the form of corner kicks and shots on goal, but were unable to get on the board.The Buckeyes nearly took the lead in the 16th minute against Milwaukee, but sophomore midfielder Mitch Bergman’s goal was called back due to an offsides call.The Ohio State defense, despite sporting a goal differential of minus two, held strong against both Marshall and Milwaukee attacks.Marshall scored in the second minute to get off to a quick start on Friday evening, but the Buckeyes rallied to battle evenly with the Thundering Herd, though ultimately unable to find an equalizer.In goal, redshirt junior goalkeeper Parker Siegfried played well, making multiple impressive saves throughout the weekend to keep his team in the match.The Buckeyes will play once again on Friday when they take on South Florida at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. read more

first_imgProtesters from the Kent Anti-Racism Network.Credit:Graham Mitchell/Barcroft Images What a great day. The fascist demo was a flop, the Margate community was outstanding, and we’ve just passed the 1000 followers mark! #wlm— KENT ANTI RACISM NET (@KentAntiRacism) 22 October 2016 A ‘White Lives Matter’ demonstration held in Margate on Saturday was met with ridicule and counter-demonstrations from anti-fascist protestors and local residents.Around 40 far-right protestors descended on the Kent town for the event, publicised on the White Lives Matter UK Facebook page as a “peaceful march … in support of deprived and depressed white communities throughout the country.”“Margate is over 95 per cent white and yet a third of the children live below the financial poverty line, 30 per cent of neighbourhoods are in the poorest 10 per cent of those in the country,” the group said. “The lives of these white people matter.”A YouTube video promoting the event, thought to be the first in Britain held under the ‘White Lives Matter’ banner, featured a song with the lyrics: “We will never be enslaved by a Zionist master plan.” Mounted police and graffiti. #wlm we love margate @artistsmakers pic.twitter.com/ImHlSbws5v— Tracey Thompson (@traceyrozier) 22 October 2016 Local business owner Lisa Richards told Kent News: “We completely respect people for their right to protest as thankfully we live in a democracy but one of the things that upset me most out of this, is that we are happy and so grateful we live in a such a great community and people were coming here and promoting hate and racism and that just appalled us so much we just had to make a stand.””We live in a time where there is real divisive news and people being blamed for the problems in our society and it is not these people and we want to put our arms around Margate and give it a big hug.” We love Margate! ❤️ #wlm pic.twitter.com/FoqgwKAXGz— Amy Zing (@AmyZingSTP) 22 October 2016 We Love Margate, because we turn our back on hate. #WLM pic.twitter.com/SdqOmFykKL— Ian Jeanes (@ijeanes) 22 October 2016 Protesters from the Kent Anti-Racism Network. Town residents put up banners saying “Margate says NO to racism”, and a hashtag created to promote the White Lives Matter cause, #WLM, was hijacked to instead spread the message: “We Love Margate”. We love #Margate #wlm and all its #diversity pic.twitter.com/xWTbC2RDbq— Mary Louis (@MaryBLouis) 22 October 2016 However, the demonstration was met with a noisy counter-protest from groups chanting “Nazi scum, off our streets” and “refugees are welcome here.” I don’t think I’ve ever felt more proud of where I live. The good people of #Margate were out in force today. Such love. Such community #WLM— GB Pizza Co (@gbPizzaCo) 22 October 2016 Welcome to the Grotto, where We Love Margate #WLM— Shell Grotto (@shellgrotto) 22 October 2016 We Love Margate #WLM on the harbour arm pic.twitter.com/C52K63Bbpj— Stan (@stanartpod) 22 October 2016 Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

first_imgUkip was in a state of open civil war on Monday night after Nigel Farage publicly warned that the party will collapse unless its sole MP Douglas Carswell is thrown out.Mr Farage, the former UK Independence Party leader, said Mr Carswell had “sought to split and divide Ukip in every way imaginable” since defecting from the Conservatives to Ukip in 2014.The two men have been at odds for years over the party’s policies but their antipathy came to a head amid claims that Mr Carswell frustrated Mr Farage’s chances of being awarded a knighthood. Mr Farage and Lord Pearson – who had kept the campaign for Mr Farage’s knighthood secret – suggested the email showed that Mr Carswell had not seriously backed the honour.Mr Farage said: “It could not be clearer that Douglas Carswell was negative in his response to the chief whip. He is consumed with jealousy and a desire to hurt both Ukip and me. What a sad figure he cuts.”Lord Pearson said the comments showed that it was “pretty clear [that Mr Carswell] he did not support” Mr Farage’s knighthood.He added: “It is true that I and others tried to get a knighthood for Nigel Farage and one way or another we failed, and we still think he should have one.“I am not going to give up. I am going to go on and try to see whether we can get him a K in the Birthday honours in the summer.” But these plans were dropped when the pair realised Mr Farage would have to resign as an MEP first before being allowed to accept the peerage.Lord Pearson then approached the Cabinet Office’s Parliamentary and political service honours committee about a knighthood for Mr Farage. It turned down the application at the end of July.The peer then asked directly Mr Carswell – who is Ukip’s leader in Westminster – to approach Gavin Williamson, the Government’s chief whip, about appealing the decision to reject Mr Farage’s application.Mr Williamson – as an “official member” of the honours committee – is allowed to recommend honours to MPs who represent minor parties in the Commons. Writing in The Telegraph, Mr Farage said: “As a party, how can we let a man represent us in the House of Commons who actively and transparently seeks to damage us? “I think there is little future for Ukip with him staying inside this party. The time for him to go is now.”   Ukip is already facing a crisis after the party’s leader Paul Nuttall failed to win last week’s by election in Stoke-on-Trent, an area in which people voted heavily for Brexit at last year’s referendum. I think there is little future for UKIP with him staying inside this party. The time for him to go is nowNigel Farage Lord Pearson Douglas Carswell insisted he had supported Nigel Farage’s knighthood Nigel Farage interviewed by Piers Morgan last weekCredit:Kieron McCarron/ITV Nigel Farage interviewed by Piers Morgan last week Lord Pearson asked Mr Carswell in the middle of December to approach Mr Williamson believing this offered “a sporting chance of getting around this committee”.On December 30th Lord Pearson emailed Mr Carswell saying: “Dear Douglas, Could you let me know how your talk with Gavin Williamson went before Christmas? By phone if you prefer? Good wishes. Malcolm.”Mr Carswell replied the next morning on December 31 – the day the New Year’s honours were announced – saying: “As promised, I did speak to the government Chief Whip. “Perhaps we might try angling to get Nigel an OBE next time round?  For services to headline writers? An MBE, maybe?” Lord Pearson replied an hour later: “Dear Douglas, Let’s speak at your convenience. Ring me? Not sure an ‘Other Buggers’ Efforts’ quite hits the spot for  Nige……..?! Malcolm”. Last week Mr Farage said he believed Ukip failed to win the Stoke by-election due to its failure to continue its strong message on migration.Now, leaked emails seen by The Telegraph show Mr Carswell mocked Mr Farage’s chances of an honour after it was turned down, saying he should be given an award “for services to headline writers”.Mr Farage said the leaked online exchange showed Mr Carswell was “consumed with jealousy and a desire to hurt me” and urged Paul Nuttall, Mr Farage’s successor, to sack him.However, Mr Carswell insisted the leaked email “confirms that I made every effort to make sure that Ukip got its fair share of peerages and honours”. Mr Nuttall declined to comment.Lord Pearson of Rannoch, Ukip’s former leader, initially tried to organise a peerage for Mr Farage, backed by Ukip peer Lord Willoughby de Broke, last July in the wake of the EU referendum. Mr Carswell insisted he had supported Mr Farage’s knighthood, and urged The Telegraph to publish his email exchange with Lord Pearson.His email showed he was “commiserating with the person who asking me to lobby on behalf of the party” on the day the New Year’s honours were announced.He said: “I would say the emails you have directly contradict those who suggest I was not trying to ensure that Ukip got its share of peerages and honours.“You cannot regard that email as anything other than being supportive that Ukip gets its fair share of peerages and honours. I am not going to say what I did or didn’t say to Gavin Williamson.“Put the email in the public domain and let readers make up their minds. It reinforces my version of events.” Douglas Carswell Lord Pearson initially tried to organise a peerage for Nigel Farage after the EU referendum in JuneCredit: EDDIE MULHOLLAND for The Telegraph Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

first_imgObjects inevitably ended up spinning uncontrollably and eventually shooting away from the beams, after picking up the movement of the rotating sound field. Human levitation and Star Trek-style tractor beams have moved a step closer after scientists proved they can stably hold a large object suspended in mid-air, using only sound. But now engineers from the University of Bristol say they have solved the problem. Instead of using a spinning field of sound to hold an object in place, they have built a…center_img Researchers have been trying for decades to trap objects using only the power of sound but it has always proved impossible to hold an item steady if it was larger than the wavelength of the sound.last_img read more

first_imgOne of the interested buyers has asked to see it ahead of the sale and wants to “hear it run,” Mr Osborne said. “And… A high-profile mystery buyer is said to be interested in Ayrton Senna’s Monaco Grand Prix-winning McLaren which is expected to fetch up the £4.5m at auction later this year. “Ayrton Senna was the most charismatic Grand Prix car driver of the modern era,” he added.center_img The buyer was rumoured to be Lewis Hamilton, the 32-year-old four-time world champion who idolised Senna. However, it is understood not to be him. Mark Osborne, head of motorsport at Bonhams, revealed that three people had expressed an interest in the 1993 McLaren-Ford MP4/8, chassis 6, one of whom was very well known.last_img read more

first_imgA water company is hunting leads on burst pipes by deploying Britain’s first sniffer dog trained to hound down water leaks.Snipe, a 16-month-old cocker spaniel, has undergone weeks of training by ex-military personnel to detect problem pipes by sniffing out tiny amounts of chlorine in tap water.The dog has now been recruited by United Utilities (UU), who supply around three million homes in the North West of England, in a UK first for dog leak detection.Snipe will be used in trials to assess if his sniffing skills can pinpoint water being wasted in rural areas where leaks are hard to detect. Owner Ross Stephenson, 32, the MD of Cape SPC, a pest extermination expert firm in Liverpool, has been putting Snipe through his paces since late last year.He said: “All I did was start off with normal tap water, and then putting in extra chlorine levels to make it stronger.”So we just put a tiny bit of that in, so the dog understands the strongest odour is the one we want them to find.”So we would have eight glass pots, one of them will have it in and every time the dog sniffs that pot he will get rewarded – a tennis ball. Snipe will be used in trials to assess if his sniffing skills can pinpoint water being wasted in rural areas Credit:Aaron Chown/PA Wire “What I had to do was take the pots outside first and start doing it in different environments and then I would take the pots away and then ended up having normal tap water, pouring it on the ground and getting the dog to search that.”So we want the dog to sit and stand and stare where the source is, so try to get the dog to stay there for 30 seconds, a ‘passive indication’.”Mr Stephenson, from Bristol, set up his firm after leaving the military two years ago, where he served with the Royal Veterinary Corps as a Corporal, deploying to war-torn Afghanistan and Iraq. His business partner Luke Jones, 27, from Bargoed, south Wales, served in the same military unit, using dogs to search for weapons, explosives and IEDs before transferring his skills to teach dogs to sniff out bed bugs – and now detecting water leaks.Mr Jones added: “All the principles are basically exactly the same, it’s just a different setting. And less stress.”UU, responsible for a network of 42,000 kilometres of pipes, fixes around 27,000 leaks a year, with a team of 140 personnel, using high tech drones, camera and sound detection equipment – and now their new recruit Snipe. Snipe the dog, with (left to right) Luke Jones, Ross Stephenson and Hannah Wardle, in Warringtoncenter_img Tap water consists of one part chlorine per million parts water – with a dog’s nose calculated as being able to detect one particle of an odour or scent in a billion.Hannah Wardle, regional leakage manager at UU, said: “The North West of England is a notoriously wet region, and sorting the leaks from the puddles especially out in the fields can be a real challenge. This is where we hope Snipe will really come into his own, as his sensitive nose can detect mains water at incredibly low concentrations.”With leakage detection it’s all about building up the evidence using a range of different technologies. We’re trialling the use of satellites and drones to get a bird’s eye view of a particular area, but the devil is in the detail, and pinpointing the exact place to start digging is more difficult than you might think.”We are hoping within the next three months we will be in a position where the dog can be properly working for us finding leaks where we don’t know where the location is already.”Snipe is going to be an invaluable asset to the team.” Snipe will be used in trials to assess if his sniffing skills can pinpoint water being wasted in rural areas  Snipe the dog, with (left to right) Luke Jones, Ross Stephenson and Hannah Wardle, in WarringtonCredit:Aaron Chown/PA Wire Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

first_imgThe parents of a child actress who played Matilda in the musical are in dispute with Westminster council over her home schooling.Edward Hardy and Eileen Tracy may have to go to court if the council does not agree that their daughter is receiving a suitable education.Their daughter Lilian, 12, who played the title role in the West End production for six months until last September, has been educated at home all her life.Her parents have now been sent a school attendance order, which means they must enrol her at a local school within 15 days or prove that she is receiving an adequate education, otherwise they face prosecution or a fine.They told The Guardian that they had sent evidence of her progress, including samples of her work and explanation about her studies, to the local authority, but the council said this was not enough.The council only became aware of her situation when the Royal Shakespeare Company, which produces the show, applied for a child performance licence so Lilian could join the cast, said the report. The musical has proved popular in the West EndCredit:Cornershop PR  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The musical has proved popular in the West Endcenter_img “Through home education, parents exercise their right to let their child develop at their own pace and cherry-pick their academic pursuits and other passions without confused outsiders breathing down their necks.“Local authorities have sufficient powers if they see a problem. But that ‘if’ is key. It’s to do with the fundamental British concept of presumption of innocence, which is enshrined in UK law. “If the state doesn’t have evidence of a problem, as in our case, then it’s really important that state officials don’t have the power to intervene, so that children and their families can be left in peace to work their own magic.”Home education has become an increasingly controversial topic as figures released last year showed that the number of home-educated children had doubled in six years.Neil Carmichael, the former chair of the Education Select Committee, told The Daily Telegraph at the time that he was “deeply concerned” by the data.In November the Government said it was working on tougher guidance for home schooling that could increase councils’ powers to intervene.A spokesman for Westminster council said: “Local authorities have a statutory obligation to ensure that resident children receive a suitable education. We have explained to Mr Hardy and Ms Tracy that we cannot solely rely on samples of their child’s work to form a view about the suitability of their education.” Ms Tracy told the newspaper: “Lilian has really thrived on being home-educated, in ways that have regularly surprised and delighted us and that have also clarified for me as an educator how children learn best – through being given freedom to follow their noses.last_img read more

Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. This came to just over £37,000 of the total £62,000 costs. The remaining amount, which comes to just under £25,000 will come out of the council coffers.Judge George criticised both parties for not being able to settle their differences and costing taxpayers, what she called, an ‘inordinate amount of public money’. Neighbours who waged a three-year war against each other over a pond for koi carp decorated with plastic herons and a Saudi flag have cost the taxpayer almost £25,000 in legal costsCredit: Martin Pope/ Martin Pope The council tried to end the war by asking the couples to sign voluntary Acceptable Behaviour Contracts, but the Abdel-Khaleks refused, leading the council to take out a civil injunction against them.After several county court hearings, the case ended up at the High Court of Justice in Birmingham last week.The court stated that the Brewsters “harboured irrational thoughts about the significance of the display of the Saudi Arabian flag” – which they complained to the council about 11 times.In the ruling, Judge Jane George stated that the distress caused by the objects was down to the Brewsters’ own “irrational and in some respects frankly bizarre interpretation of what things meant.”In her report she called the reaction from the Brewsters “extraordinary” and added: “No alarm, distress or harassment can be caused to a reasonable person by seeing a country’s flag hanging from a tree in a neighbour’s garden”.The court ruled that an injunction should be enforced against the Abdel-Khaleks to stop them from hanging items in their garden “in plain sight of the Brewsters property”, but said that they should “not be prevented from hanging items over the pond” should they wish to do so.As a result of the case, Mr and Mrs Abdel-Khalek were ordered to pay 60 percent of the council’s legal costs. In their complaints, the Brewsters said the “items hanging from trees” were “offensive”, telling police and council workers the items were put up “deliberately to cause them alarm and distress”. They also said the items were designed to “intimidate them” and made reference in emails to the council and police that accused Mr and Mrs Abdel-Khalek of being “extremists” – despite the police telling them the Saudi flag was the “national flag of a sovereign country”. Neighbours who waged a three-year war against each other over a pond for koi carp have cost the taxpayer almost £25,000 in legal costs.Dr Mohamed Abdel-Khalek, a 67-year-old retired eye surgeon, and his wife Aila, a 42-year-old clinical engineer, installed a 20ft-long pond in their garden in 2015 prompting complaints from neighbours Philip and Jennifer Brewster.Mr Brewster, a 70-year-old solicitor who specialises in land development and commercial property, and his wife Jennifer, 69, complained that the noise from the pond’s pump was “loud and continuous” and claimed it caused “water leakages” into their property.The Brewsters also complained to the council about Mr Abdel-Khalek hanging plastic herons, a small plastic Santa and a Saudi flag in a tree above his pond.Mr Abdel-Khalek said the objects were put there to protect his koi carp from predatory birds. Neighbours who waged a three-year war against each other over a pond for koi carp decorated with plastic herons and a Saudi flag have cost the taxpayer almost £25,000 in legal costs read more

“We need to utilise assessment methods that promote learning and at the same time reduce the likelihood that contract cheating can happen”.Prof Newton’s study, How Common Is Commercial Contract Cheating In Higher Education And Is It Increasing? A Systematic Review, is published in Frontiers in Education. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. As many as one in seven university students have cheated on their degrees by paying someone else to write their essays for them, according to a new study.Increasing numbers of graduates are said to have acted dishonestly by using “essay mills” during the last four years.A study by Swansea University reviewed questionnaires dating back to 1978 where students were asked if they had ever paid for someone else to complete their work.The findings – covering 54,514 participants – showed a 15.7 per cent rise in the number of students who admitted cheating between 2014 and 2018.The study also noted that cheating at universities was on the increase worldwide.Essay mills are currently legal in the UK despite being outlawed elsewhere, and an active petition is calling for the Government to ban their use.They are difficult to identify as the essays are tailored for individual subjects and appear original. Professor Phil Newton, from Swansea University, said the UK is at risk becoming a haven for those selling essays to students.He said: “The UK risks becoming a country where essay mills find it easy to do business.”These findings underscore the need for legislation to tackle essay mills, alongside improvements in the way students are assessed and awareness-raising of the fundamentals of academic integrity. read more

“The racks are lawful on the basis that their siting does not constitute a material change of use of the land.”Richard Genge, planning and regeneration manager at Poole Borough Council, said: “We are aware of this and is currently actively investigating the matter.” Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Pensioners have been left outraged after piles of old vehicles at a nearby car scrapyard reached 50ft high behind their homes.Residents in Poole, Dorset, described the five-storey stacks of written off cars as a “hideous monstrosity” which now dwarfs their bungalows.Homeowners also warned the giant structure is a fire hazard amid fears over a repeat of a blaze that swept through the compound in 2016, when over 170 vehicles were destroyed.Charles Tent, the scrapyard owners, said the stacking system enabled vehicles to be piled up in a “more modern and cleaner way”.However, retired engineer Charles Caffey, 73, claimed the “eyesore”, which backs directly onto his home, has blocked out natural light and is a safety risk.He said: “When I’m sat in the back garden it feels like I’m in the middle of a scrap yard. “The cars are so close to us I and the other residents fear what could happen in a fire.Poole Borough Council has written to Charles Tent and said it was “investigating” amid claims the structure may need planning permission.However, the owners insist the pile of cars is legal due to a “loophole” in planning laws.Planning Consultant Ken Parke, who have applied for a lawful development certificate on behalf of Charles Tent, said: “”It is not the height that determines whether or not the racking is development requiring planning permission. read more