Sunrun lands big contract for linked residential solar-plus-storage systems in Hawaii

first_imgSunrun lands big contract for linked residential solar-plus-storage systems in Hawaii FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:Sunrun won another big deal to deliver residential solar-battery systems at grid scale, this one fine-tuned to serve utility Hawaiian Electric’s unique island grids.Sunrun, the leading U.S. residential solar installer, announced Wednesday that it has pledged to install up to 1,000 of its Brightbox home solar-battery systems on the island of Oahu by 2024, as part of a contract with Open Access Technology International (OATI). That is the Minneapolis-based grid technology provider that’s running HECO’s new “demand response” program, which looks more like a miniature version of what a transmission grid operator like PJM or CAISO does than the traditional definition of demand response.The 1,000 Brightbox battery systems Sunrun will install over the next five years will add up to about 4.3 megawatts of capacity on Oahu, out of the 17.8 megawatts of capacity and grid services that OATI has pledged to deliver on the island, according to figures provided by Sunrun.This isn’t the first time that Sunrun has bundled solar-battery systems for grid needs. In February it won a bid to deliver 20 megawatts of capacity to ISO New England by 2022, which it intends to deliver through a network of about 5,000 homes across the grid operator’s six-state region. And in July, Sunrun landed two contracts in California — one with community choice aggregator (CCA) East Bay Community Energy to deliver 2 megawatt-hours of residential solar-plus-storage capacity, and another with municipal utility Glendale Water & Power for 12.8 megawatts of capacity.The new Hawaii deployment will expand on the scope of services Sunrun has been asked to provide from its aggregations so far, Robert Harris, Sunrun director of public policy, said in an interview. That’s largely because HECO, which faces a 100-percent-by-2045 renewable mandate, faces challenges that mainland utilities don’t in stabilizing its grid to manage this rising share of renewable energy.“This is a bit more sophisticated than what we’ve done in the past,” Harris said. While Sunrun’s New England and California contracts are focused on multi-hour capacity, HECO and OATI will need to call on its resources for so-called “fast frequency response,” or FFR, as well.More: Sunrun lands another big virtual power plant deal, this time in Hawaiilast_img

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